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Romeo and Juliet

By | April 2013
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Romeo and Juliet

Here, in the famous balcony scene, Romeo and Juliet reveal their love to each other, and at Juliet's suggestion, they plan to marry. In this act it seems that Romeo has forgotten all about Rosaline and has found true love in which Juliet returns unlike with Rosaline.

Shakespeare uses light and dark imagery in this scene. As Romeo stands in the shadows, he looks to the balcony and compares Juliet to the sun. He then asks the sun to rise and kill the envious moon. Romeo had always compared Rosaline to the moon, and now, his love for Juliet has outshone the moon.

The scene takes place at night, illustrating the way Romeo and Juliet's love exists in a world which her family the Capulet’s and Romeo’s family the Montagues are at war with each other. As night ends, the two are forced to part to avoid being discovered by the Capulet kinsmen. Romeo is a very romantic and a dreamer in this scene while Juliet is a practical character. Romeo returns to the religious imagery used between the lovers in their sonnets at the feast when he describes Juliet as, "a bright angel" and "dear saint." The recurring use of religious imagery emphasizes the purity of Romeo and Juliet's love. Romeo begins to display signs of increasing maturity in this scene. Romeo is no longer the melancholy lover of Act I. He has fallen in love with Juliet and they plan to get married. Juliet tells Romeo that she will send the nurse to Romeo for him to send a message to Juliet about their wedding details.

At the end of this scene they both departure in their separate ways to avoid being seen together as their families are constantly fighting. This concludes the scene in

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