Romeo and Juliet

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Romeo Disrupts and Restores Order
In William Shakespeare’s play, Romeo and Juliet, Romeo helps disrupt and restore order throughout the play by wooing Juliet, getting himself banished, and by killing himself. In Capulet’s house, Tybalt sees that Romeo is dancing with Juliet and he tells lord Montague and asks if he can attack him, but lord Montague says tells him not to, which leads Tybalt to say, “ I will withdraw; but this intrusion shall,/ Now seeming sweet, convert to bitt’rest gall” (I, v, 91-92). Romeo disrupts order in this scene because he makes Tybalt want to fight him, which leads to Tybalt killing Mercutio and which makes Romeo enraged leading him to killing Tybalt later on in the play. After the Prince tells Romeo that he is to be exiled, Juliet then wants to kill herself and says “Come, cords; come, nurse. I’ll to my wedding bed;/ And death, not Romeo, take my maidenhead!” (II, ii, 136-137). Juliet is so sad that Romeo has been banished that she wants to use the cords that were supposed to bring her happiness, to bring her death which is another way Romeo brought disorder in the play. After Romeo and Juliet kill themselves Lords Montague and Capulet end up settling the feud and Capulet says “ O brother Montague, give me thy hand./ This is my daughter’s jointure, for no more/ Can I demand” (V, iii, 296- 298). Then Montague says “There shall no figure at such rate be set/ As that of true and faithful Juliet” (V, iii, 301-302). Lord Montague and Lord Capulet realized how unimportant the feud was and how much trouble it caused to both families because of the strong message that Romeo and Juliet’s death sent to them which overall, restored order in the play and resolved to feud. Throughout the play Romeo was able to disrupt order and in the end restore it which ended the play with the Capulets and Montagues forgetting about the feud and becoming friends.
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