Romeo and Juliet

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Act 2 Scene 2 is a very famous and touching Scene in Shakespeare’s play ‘Romeo and Juliet’. It shows the romance, affection and danger of Romeo and Juliet’s relationship love which makes the play moving. Romeo and Juliet’s thoughts are shown widely in this scene and, as an audience, we start to see how their love may or may not have meant to be.

Romeo’s feelings towards Juliet are shown in the beginning of Act 2 Scene 2. It begins when Romeo is creeping into the garden. There is an underlying threat because he may get caught for crossing onto perilous territory. This makes the audience feel anxious but is also builds up excitement. Also, suspense is created when the lights turn on in Luhrmann’s play because Romeo is taking huge risks to see Juliet which could end in death. Moments later silence approaches when the ‘bright [angelic]’ Juliet enters the scene on the balcony. Romeo’s feelings are shown in his description of Juliet as she enters; he refers to her as a ‘saint’ and ‘an angel’ because of her beauty and innocence. Similar to Act 1 Scene 5, when Romeo and Juliet meet, he uses religious terms such as ‘holy’ and ‘shrine’ to describe Juliet and this gives us an understanding that Romeo has respect for her. The word ‘saint’ shows he elevates her as if she were a pure and holy.

However Romeo is presented as being troubled in Act 2 Scene 2 when he believes he is unworthy of Juliet; ‘I am too bold. ‘Tis not to me she speaks’. However, Romeo soon realises that Juliet loves Romeo as much as he adores her. Removing this line in Luhrmann’s production and placing Juliet on the same level as Romeo removes their large distance between them and shows their intimacy. However, it Luhrmann many also be indicating that they are rushing into their relationship since they only recently met. This can be comparable to Friar Laurence’s reaction in Act 2 Scene 3 to their love as he also indicates that Romeo should go ‘[Wise and slow]’ because ‘they stumble that run fast’....
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