Read full document

Romantics Poets

By | March 2013
Page 1 of 2
Romantic poets represent nature as the creator and presenter of power. The poems “The Tables Turned” by William Wordsworth and “Enter Poems Name Here” by Percy Shelly both offer the idea of nature possessing power that are unmatched by the rising technology and scientific developments. Though there are many different arguments for nature’s possession of power, both texts propose that nature both presents and creates power. The poem ‘Tables Turned’ by William Wordsworth represents nature as man’s source of wealth, knowledge and power. One idea of this text is that nature creates and possesses power. Wordsworth personifies nature in order to convey it as a conscious being, possessing not only immerse power, but also emotions such as sympathy, reinforcing nature’s creation and presentation of power: Wordsworth represents nature possessing “a world of ready wealth”; also personifying nature as having a heart that ‘watches and receives’ and furthermore claiming that nature can teach man more than “any of the sages can”. Depiction of nature’s power over science and curiosity are also employed in order to reinforce the significance of man and nature. Wordsworth describes items associated with science, i.e. books, as “tis a dull and endless strife” and man should instead “come and hear the woodland linnet” because “there’s more wisdom in it”. Wordsworth does not only present nature as possessing great wisdom, but also claim that nature can share it with man, by saying “Let nature be your teacher”, reinforcing that nature can create power. The continual dismissal of books, science and curiosity, Wordsworth demonstrates his point of view that nature can provide all the information – power – that man needs: “Up! up! my Friend, and quit your books”. Thus, Wordsworth, one of many romantic poets, represents nature in two roles in terms of power; creator and presenter.  “Ode to the West Wind” by Percy Shelley is a rhythmic poem that portrays the west wind as having the power to...
Hide

Rate this document

What do you think about the quality of this document?

Share this document

Let your classmates know about this document and more at Studymode.com