Romanesque Architecture vs. Gothic Architecture

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Tabitha Crosby
Dr. Maineville
Hum1020
10/07 /2012

Romanesque Architecture and Gothic Architecture
Throughout history it’s simple to understand how so many were inspired to create masterpieces we see and love today. Many years ago beauty was shaped in almost every feature, sculpture, and building. One of the most memorable of these iconic creations can be seen in Romanesque and Gothic architecture; however even though they are both similar they also have many differences. These themes were carried out throughout many parts of Europe sending both fear and beauty through the hearts of every being to lay their eyes upon them. Whether it was in its distinctive windows, unique exterior and interior designs, or any of the other myriad architectural features, Romanesque and Gothic architecture are identifiable if one can distinguish the two types of styles. It was the age of the development of Romanesque and Gothic Architecture where the battle began to reach greater and higher achievements. During this new development a new task was held that gave a new appreciation for light, during the medieval age many structures were built sheltered and isolated from the world outside. The inside of these buildings would seem dark and on some occasions moldy. With the development of new structures the idea for these new Gothic structures was to make a more pleasant place to be. By allowing higher and grander windows it allowed more light in these usual dark places, it removed many issues with mold and eliminated the use of open doors on raining days. It was a great achievement for the new structures and it was a feature that remained with them throughout time. However many were not so focused on the idea of an open and airy concept. The Romanesque buildings are known for their straight and boxy appearance. In Roman structures the walls were large and thick and had to create smaller windows as to not weaken to walls with large gaps. The Civic Hall in Massa Marittima, Italy...
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