Roles, Responsibilities and Relationships in Lifelong Learning.

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Title: Roles, Responsibilities and Relationships in Lifelong Learning. An assignment by: uzma kanwal
Submitted to: Mr. Ferdous Ahmad
Subject: PTLLS
27th April, 2013

1.1 Summaries key aspects of legislation, regulatory requirements and codes of practice relating to own roles and responsibilities. There are many codes of practice, regulations and legislations about which a teacher should be aware of. First we must need to know about those legislations, regulations and codes of practices which are relevant to our teaching. Some of these are basic and common to all teachers and some are subject or organization specific. Legislation and Codes of Practice:

• Legislative requirement: A duty to act according to the law as defined in an Act of Parliament and usually enforceable through the courts. • Code of Practice: A set of rules which outlines how a person is expected to behave in a particular profession or situation. • Statutory code of practice: A Code of Practice approved by Parliament and acceptable as evidence in any legal action.

Generic Legislation and Codes of Practice

These are some examples of generic legislation and codes of practice: • Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.
The Health & Safety at Work Act (1974) defines the compulsions of an employer to to make sure that not a single employ is on risk at work and all of the employ should responsible with the Health and Safety regulations which are imposed by Employees. Risk assessments should be taken into consider where necessary. • Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000.

• Disability Discrimination Act 1995 and 2005 (DDA).
Disability Discrimination Act (1995 amended 2005) requires that necessary adjustment must be given to allow them to fully participate in their learning. • Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001.

• Education and Skills Act (2008) .
This law intends to increase participation in learning for young people and adults. • Equality Act 2006.
This law aims to remove discrimination, reduce inequality, protect human rights and to build good relations. • Data Protection Act 1998.
The Data Protection Act (1998 amended 2003) covers the use of electronic data that how and when to acquire, hold, process and share the data about individuals. • Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988

This law relates to the copying, adaptation and distribution of material, such as computer programs and the martial found from the internet. • IFL Code of Practice for Teachers (2008)
As a teacher it is important to make sure that we are registered with the Institute for Learning (IFL) and stick to their preferred behaviors which says that we must treat the profession and learners with respect at all times and maintain the skilled knowledge in our subject. • Safer practice, safer learning (2007)

Responsibilities for safeguarding vulnerable adults in the learning and skills sector. • The Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act (2006)
It was introduced to provide a sure mechanism to ensure anyone working with children of young adults is checked properly by the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB).   There are several health and safety codes of practice and statutory tools, which may impact on our teaching role. Some examples are: • Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992.

• Control of substances hazardous to health Regulations 2002. • Work with display screen equipment: Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992 Common Risks in ordinary classrooms may include:

• Trailing electricity cables from projectors etc.
• Fire exits blocked.
• Fire exit notices not clearly displayed.
• Learners rocking on chairs.
• Bags, briefcases are not put under tables, so creating trip hazards. • Risk of tutor’s eyesight being damaged by looking into the beam of a data projector, that’s why laser pointer should be used. So...
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