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Arthur Conan Doyle
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the professional athlete, see Conan Doyle (rugby player). Sir Arthur Conan Doyle|

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle|
Born| Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle
22 May 1859
Edinburgh, Scotland|
Died| 7 July 1930 (aged 71)
Crowborough, East Sussex, England|
Occupation| Novelist, short story writer, poet, physician| Nationality| Scottish|
Citizenship| British|
Genres| Detective fiction, science fiction, historical novels, non-fiction| Notable work(s)| Stories of Sherlock Holmes
The Lost World|
Influences[show]|
Influenced[show]|
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Signature| |
Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930[1]) was a Scottish[2] physician and writer, most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, generally considered a milestone in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. He was a prolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novels. Contents  [hide]  * 1 Life and career * 1.1 Early life * 1.2 Writing career * 1.3 Marriages and family * 1.4 "Death" of Sherlock Holmes * 1.5 Political campaigning * 1.6 Correcting injustice * 1.7 Spiritualism * 1.8 Death * 2 Bibliography * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links| -------------------------------------------------

[edit]Life and career
[edit]Early life
Arthur Conan Doyle was born on 22 May 1859 at 11 Picardy Place, Edinburgh, Scotland.[3][2] His father, Charles Altamont Doyle, was English of Irish descent, and his mother, born Mary Foley, was Irish. They married in 1855.[4] In 1864 the family dispersed due to Charles's growing alcoholism and the children were temporarily housed across Edinburgh. In 1867, the family came together again and lived in the squalid tenement flats at 3 Sciennes Place.[5] Although he is now referred to as "Conan Doyle", the origin of this compound surname is uncertain. The entry in which his baptism is recorded in the register of St Mary's Cathedral in Edinburgh gives "Arthur Ignatius Conan" as his Christian name, and simply "Doyle" as his surname. It also names Michael Conan as his godfather.[6] Supported by wealthy uncles, Conan Doyle was sent to the Roman Catholic Jesuit preparatory school Hodder Place, Stonyhurst, at the age of nine (1868-1870). He then went on to Stonyhurst College until 1875. From 1875 to 1876 he was educated at the Jesuit school Stella Matutina in Feldkirch, Austria.[5] From 1876 to 1881 he studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh, including a period working in the town of Aston (now a district of Birmingham) and in Sheffield, as well as in Shropshire at Ruyton-XI-Towns.[7] While studying, Conan Doyle began writing short stories. His earliest extant fiction, "The Haunted Grange of Goresthorpe", was unsuccessfully submitted to Blackwood's Magazine.[5] His first published piece "The Mystery of Sasassa Valley", a story set in South Africa, was printed in Chambers's Edinburgh Journal on 6 September 1879.[8][5] Later that month, on 20 September, he published his first non-fictional article, "Gelsemium as a Poison" in the British Medical Journal.[5] Following his term at university, he was employed as a doctor on the Greenland whaler the Hope of Peterhead in 1880 and after his graduation, as a ship's surgeon on the SS Mayumba during a voyage to the West African coast in 1881. [5] He completed his doctorate on the subject of tabes dorsalis in 1885.[9] Doyle's father died in 1893, in the Crichton Royal, Dumfries, after many years of psychiatric illness.[10][11] [edit]Writing career

Portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget, 1904
In 1882 he joined former classmate George Turnavine Budd as his partner at a medical practice in Plymouth, but their relationship proved difficult, and Conan Doyle soon left to set...
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