Role of Sex Education

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PSYCHOLOGY REPORT|
EXPLORE THE ROLE OF SEX EDUCATION AND AIDS INFORMATION IN THE CLASSROOM|

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Submitted To
Prof. Navin Kumar

Submitted By
Aayush

Guide:Dr.Navin Kumar1
Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore
April 2013
Abstract
The study deals with social outlook towards sex education and AIDS patients. It aims to understand public perception towards the same. The study was carried out in 3 steps. The research outreach involved university students over a period of 11/2 months. The students were required to answer a questionnaire dealing with sex education and day to day interactions with an AIDS patient. The research delved into the varied responses to understand general understanding of the terms ‘Sex Education’ and what deals with it and behavioural approach towards an AIDS patient in your immediate workspace or private life. The study allows us to conclude that the outlook to sex education and dealings with AIDS patients are liberal and progressive thought process of the society. Keywords: sex education, sex, education, students, HIV, parents

INTRODUCTION:

What is sex education?

Sex education is needful and necessary for today’s youth. Being aware of the exposure given to students in school, in the media and among their peers, sex education not only teaches them about sexual intimacy, but also enlightens them on their reproductive systems, birth control, and sexually transmitted diseases. It also exposes them to their gender identity, gender role, family role, body images, sexual expression, intimacy and the marriage relationship.

Why is it important?
Sexual health can be identified through the free and responsible expressions of sexual capabilities that foster harmonious personal and social wellness, enriching life within an ethical framework[1].

Sex Education in schools addresses the issue of sexual health and also makes students aware of the above mentioned points, thus our society can only benefit from sex education.

Sex education has been and is still a taboo to the Indian society but according to the Justice Verma committee, set up after the Delhi gang rape case,there is no basis to say sex education leads to early sexual initiation by children [2]. The committee suggests that sex education be introduced in schools in a clinical manner through trained teachers and child counsellors.

Children should be able to access informed, non-prejudiced sources in sexuality rather than misinformation through internet ormisleading advertising. Ever since the internet boom and the outburst of the social media platform many teenagers turn to the internet and seek solutions for their queries regarding sex and the information they get is not always right and is often misleading. Some common misconceptions: 1. Many people believe that washing the genitals after sex protected them from STDs. Likewise, urinating after sex and use of oral contraceptives are considered as ways of preventing STDs [3]. 2. You can get STDs from toilet seats.

3. You can tell if someone has a STD.

Educating students about STDs has also become very important in recent times. Most people have a stigmatizing attitude toward people living with HIV aids and also misconceptions about its transmission routes. Hence sex education can bring about a positive change in the society.

Methodology:
1. Research method:
This research is on the analysis of sexual education in schools. Over 230 university students were the respondents for this research. As this research needed the respondents to make their evaluation on their experience of sexual education thus, it was suitable for the university students to be the respondents since their age and cognitive level are at its best level to evaluate [4]. In the background of this research, the respondents are matured thinkers that are able to make comparison and evaluation on their experience of sexual development...
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