Role of Cognition in Counseling

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ROLE OF COGNITION IN COUNSELING

TABLE OF CONTENT.

Introduction………………………………………………………….. 3

Cognitive therapy…………………………………………………….4

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy...……………………………….4

Characteristics of cognitive-behavioral therapy….5

Virtual Reality Therapy...…………………………………………8

Rational Emotive Therapy………….……………………………8

Transactional ANALYSIS…………………………………………...8

conlusion………………………………………………………………..9

reference………………………………………………………………10

Role of cognition in counseling

Introduction

Cognitive therapy centers on the belief that our thoughts are influenced by how we feel. There are a number of different cognitive therapies, including Cognitive-Behavioral, Reality, Rational Emotive and Transactional Analysis. Each of these cognitive approaches to counseling can help a client through the counseling process, by providing further understanding of the way our thoughts are sometimes distorted.

Cognitive therapy focuses on the present. This means that issues from the past that are influencing current thinking, are acknowledged but not concentrated on. Instead a counselor will work with the client on identifying what is causing distress in present thinking. What links these different forms of cognitive therapy is the way in which the counseling relationship, between a counselor and client, develops. Assertiveness exercises, role-playing and homework are also part of the supportive one-to-one sessions a client will have with a counselor. In this paper will review and analyze the role cognition in counseling.

Cognitive therapy

Studies have shown that cognitive therapy is an effective treatment for depression. It is comparable in effectiveness to antidepressants and interpersonal therapy or psychodynamic therapy. The combination of cognitive therapy and antidepressants has been shown to be effective in managing severe or chronic depression. Cognitive therapy has also proven beneficial to patients who have only a partial response to antidepressants. There is good evidence that cognitive therapy reduces relapse rates. In addition, some evidence has shown that cognitive therapy is effective in treating adolescent depression. Here are a number of the different cognitive therapies, including Cognitive-Behavioral, virtual Reality, Rational Emotive and Transactional Analysis.

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

This cognitive approach to counseling is based on the belief that learning comes from personal experience. Counseling will focus on a client’s ability to accept behavior, clarify problems and difficulties and understand the reasoning behind the importance of setting goals. With the help of self management training, assertive exercises and role-playing the counselor can help a client work towards goals.

Characteristics of cognitive-behavioral therapy

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is based on the idea that our thoughts cause our feelings and behaviors, not external things, like people, situations, and events. The benefit of this fact is that we can change the way we think to feel / act better even if the situation does not change.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is considered among the most rapid in terms of results obtained. The average number of sessions clients receive (across all types of problems and approaches to CBT) is only 16. Other forms of therapy, like psychoanalysis, can take years. What enables CBT to be briefer are its highly instructive nature and the fact that it makes use of homework assignments. CBT is time-limited in that we help clients understand at the very beginning of the therapy process that there will be a point when the formal therapy will end. The ending of the formal therapy is a decision made by the therapist and client. Therefore, CBT is not an open-ended, never-ending process.

A sound therapeutic relationship is necessary for effective therapy, but not the focus. Some forms of therapy assume...
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