Role of Behavior Therapy Theories in Clinical Hypnosis

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 136
  • Published : December 8, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Title: Role of behavior therapy theories in clinical hypnosis  
  Date:27/7/12
 
  Author:Paul Daly
 
 

 

Role
 of
 behavior
 therapy
 theories
 in
 clinical
 hypnosis
  27th
 July
 2012
  Paul
 Daly
 

 

 
  Page
 1
 of
 5
 

This
 essay
 sets
 out
 to
 explore
 the
 relevance
 of
 behavior
 therapy
 theories
 in
 clinical
 hypnosis
 with
  specific
 focus
 on
 the
 treatment
 of
 anxiety
 conditions
 and
 unwanted
 habits.
 Behavioral
 theories
 have
  been
 used
 to
 explain
 and
 treat
 many
 psychological
 neurosis
 such
 as
 phobias,
 inappropriate
 pattern
  matching
  leading
  to
  adverse
  reactions
  such
  as
  anger,
  fear
  or
  anxiety
  to
  certain
  stimuli
  and
  unwanted
 habits
 such
 as
 nail
 biting,
 thumb
 sucking
 and
 even
 self
 harm
 (Gross
 2005
 and
  Hofmann
 &
  Weinberger
 2007).
 Behavior
 therapy
 is
 based
 on
 the
 theory
 that
 all
 behavior
 is
 a
 learned
 unconscious
  response
  to
  a
  given
  stimulus
  and
  as
  such
  can
  be
  unlearned
  or
  relearned
  (Kroger
  2008).
  Hypnosis,
  communicating
 directly
 with
 the
 unconscious
 mind
 offers
 the
 ideal
 vehicle
 for
 the
 use
 of
 behavior
  therapy
 techniques
 and
 may
 increase
 the
 efficacy
 of
 such
 techniques
 especially
 when
 used
 to
 treat
  phobias
 and
 unwanted
 habits.
  Behavior
  Therapy
  Theories
  focus
  on
  the
  way
  in
  which
  we
  learn
  and
  in
  particular
  how
  we
  learn
  both
  good
 and
 bad
 responses
 or
 reflexes
 to
 particular
 stimulus
 (Gross,
 2005).
 
 Classical
 conditioning
 (or
  learning)
 was
 first
 described
 by
 Ivan
 Pavlov
 in
 the
 context
 of
 experiments
 on
 animals
 and
 was
 later
  developed
  by
  the
  founder
  of
  the
  Behaviorism
  movement
  in
  psychology,
  J.
  B.
  Watson.
  Watson’s
  seminal
 and
 somewhat
 controversial
 experiment
 known
 as
 “Little
 Albert”
 (Watson
 &
 Rayner,
 1920),
  demonstrated
  how
  Pavlov’s
  conditioned
  reflex
  to
  a
  given
  stimulus
  could
  be
  observed
  not
  only
  in
  animals
  but
  also
  in
  humans.
  Both
  Watson
  and
  Pavlov
  also
  observed
  that
  these
  learned
  responses
  could
 be
 unlearned
 over
 time,
 a
 process
 known
 as
 extinction
 (Waxman
 1989).
 
  The
  Behaviorist
  view
  is
  that
  this
  learned
  response
  to
  a
  stimulus
  is
  an
  unconscious
  reflex
  to
  a
  trigger
  (Klein
  2008),
  which
  can
  then
  be
  further
  reinforced
  through
  a
  process
  known
  as
  Operant
  Conditioning
 (Skinner
 1938).
 Operant
 Conditioning
 focuses
 on
 the
 concept
 that
 behavior
 is
 driven
  primarily
  by
tracking img