Page 1 of 7

What role did the Nazi Party play in the revolutionising of Germa...

Continues for 6 more pages »
Read full document

What role did the Nazi Party play in the revolutionising of German State and society between 1933 and 1939? With full Bibliography

  • By
  • December 2, 2003
  • 2405 Words
  • 90 Views
Page 1 of 7
It cannot be argued that the Nazi Party did not make drastic changes within the German State and within German Society. What is arguable is whether the Nazi Party could be deemed responsible for revolutionising Germany. This essay will look to see if there was any transformation within German society and if so what role did the Nazi Party play. To ascertain the role played by the Nazi Party this essay will explore the political, economical, and social changes made during the period of 1933 - 1939 and see what the direct consequences were for the German people.

The popularity of the NSDAP was inexplicably high with members numbering 850,000 in 1933. It would seem that although many NSDAP members joined initially as opportunists thinking that they would benefit their careers, some believed in the ideologies of the Party and others felt by joining they could help to improve the economic conditions of the State. The fact that in July 1933 saw the Law against the Formation of Parties whereby The Nazi Party became the only political party in Germany, would account for many of its members. All other parties were banned and their leaders imprisoned. Hitler was less concerned with the formation of new political parties but more concerned with the reformation of old parties such as the 'socialist or communist parties under other names'. Nazi Party members were given better jobs, better houses and special privileges. There were certainly good incentives for people to join. The shear numbers of members whom most of which gained privileges would in itself dictate that the Nazi Party was responsible for revolutionising society purely on the basis of vast numbers of people gaining a better quality of lifestyle.

It could be argued however, that because Hitler was offering incentives to encourage people to join the Party, an ever increasing chasm of social differences was developing; a good example of this would be Nazi Party's KdF 'Strength through Joy' organisation....