Roland Barthes - Mythologies

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MYTHOLOGIES

MYTHOLOGIES
Roland Barthes
Selected and translated from the French by ANNETTE LAVERS

Books by Roland Barthes A Barthes Reader Camera Lucida Critical Essays The Eiffel Tower and Other Mythologies Elements of Semiology The Empire of Signs The Fashion System The Grain of the Voice Image-Music-Text A Lover's Discourse Michelet Mythologies New Critical Essays On Racine The Pleasure of the Text The Responsibility of Forms Roland Barthes The Rustle of Language Sade / Fourier / Loyola The Semiotic Challenge S/Z Writing Degree Zero

THE NOONDAY PRESS - NEW YORK FARRAR, STRAUS & GIROUX
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Contents
Translated from the French Mythologies (c) 1957 by Editions du Seuil, Paris Translation (c) 1972 by Jonathan Cape Ltd. All rights reserved Library of Congress catalog card number: 75-185427 Of the essays reproduced in this book, "The World of Wrestling" first appeared in Esprit, "The Writer on Holiday" in FranceObservateur, and the remainder in Les Lettres Nouvelles. TRANSLATOR'S NOTE PREFACE TO THE 1970 EDITION PREFACE TO THE 1957 EDITION MYTHOLOGIES The World of Wrestling The Romans in Films The Writer on Holiday The 'Blue Blood' Cruise Blind and Dumb Criticism Soap-powders and Detergents The Poor and the Proletariat Operation Margarine Dominici, or the Triumph of Literature The Iconography of the Abbé Pierre Novels and Children Toys The Face of Garbo Wine and Milk Steak and Chips The Nautilus and the Drunken Boat The Brain of Einstein The Jet-man The Blue Guide Ornamental Cookery Neither-Nor Criticism Striptease The New Citroën Photography and Electoral Appeal The Lost Continent Plastic The Great Family of Man The Lady of the Camellias MYTH TODAY Myth is a type of speech Myth as a semiological system The form and the concept The signification 7 9 11 15 26 29 32 34 36 39 41 43 47 50 53 56 58 62 65 68 71 74 78 81 84 88 91 94 97 100 103 109 109 111 117 121 4

Manufactured in the United States of America Twenty-fifth printing, 1991 3

Reading and deciphering myth Myth as stolen language The bourgeoisie as a joint-stock company Myth is depoliticized speech Myth on the Left Myth on the Right Necessity and limits of mythology

127 131 137 142 145 148 156

Translator's Note

The style of Mythologies, which strikes one at first as being highly poetic and idiosyncratic, later reveals a quasi-technical use of certain terms. This is in part due to an effort to account for the phenomena of mass culture by resorting to new models. First and foremost among such models, as indicated in the Preface, is linguistics, whose mark is seen not so much in the use of a specialized vocabulary as in the extension to other fields of words normally reserved for speech or writing, such as transcription, retort, reading, univocal (all used in connection with wrestling), or to decipher (plastics or the 'good French Wine'). The author's teaching is also associated with a rediscovery of ancient rhetoric, which provides one of the connotations of the word figure when it is used in connection with cooking or wrestling. Spectacle and gesture are often irreplaceable and refer to the interplay of action, representation and alienation in man and in society. Other terms belong to philosophical vocabulary, whether traditional (e.g. substance, which also has echoes of Bachelard and Hjelmslev), Sartrean/Marxist (e.g. a paradox, a car or a cathedral are said to be consumed by the public), or recent (e.g. closure, which heralds the combinative approach of semiology and its philosophical consequences). Transference connotes the discoveries of psycho-analysis on the relations between the abstract and the concrete. There is in addition a somewhat humorous plea for a reasoned use of neologism (cf. pp. 120-21) which foreshadows later reflections on the mutual support of linguistic and social conventions. Such characteristics have been kept in the hope of retaining some of the flavour of the original.

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Finally, the author's footnotes are...
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