Robert Frost's: a Minor Bird Analytical Essay

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Ashley Olivia Mrs. Gazso 1 February 2013 English 11-1: AA 1 Silencing Frost’s lines are inconspicuous and do not draw attention to the language being used. In his poem, A Minor Bird, Robert Frost makes the language seem simplistic on the outside. By doing so, it causes the reader to be initially unaware of the depth and profoundness of the poem. The deeper meaning in the poem is inconspicuous because it is unclear at this point. Frost uses the “minor bird” as a symbol for the innocence of something within nature. Nature, especially birds don’t have any idea that they are upsetting anyone around them. The bird seems indifferent to the feelings of person he is singing to. He does not realize he is upsetting the person. This brings forth the idea of man vs. nature. Does the man have the right to stop the bird from chirping? One thing in nature shouldn’t have the absolute right to shut down another thing in nature. The bird seems indifferent to the aggravated feelings of the person it is singing to. The person in the poem then rises to an even higher thought. Does anyone have the right to, "...silence any song"(Frost 1)? Is there a freedom in nature to express yourself even though you upset those around you? Is the core of this simple poem, extremely profound then? Is the freedom to communicate, the freedom of speech, a right of all nature? Robert Frost uses the type of language he

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does in his poems to bring forth such questions. To really have his readers dig deep for the meaning in his literature. This idea of absolute right is the profound core of the poem. When something is irritating, a person still doesn’t have the right to silence it. The bird has the right to sing because who has the right to extinguish another? Frost is suggesting that you have the option when things such as this are upsetting us at this point. Yet, in the third couplet, the person took on part of the blame for his own feelings,...
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