Robert Frost's Use of Aminmals and Insects in His Works

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  • Topic: Robert Frost, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, Sleep
  • Pages : 2 (567 words )
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  • Published : July 19, 2008
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Robert Frost’s Use of Animals and Insects in His Works
Robert Frost was born on March 26, 1874 in California and moved to New Hampshire when he was eleven years old, after his father died. In his poems about familiar objects and characters of New England give his readers a sense of being there no matter where it was read. Frost’s transcendentalist view of nature and the descriptions of the way nature made him feel pulls the reader in and makes them feel like he is a part of the story. In a number of Robert Frost’s poetry he uses animals and insects to help articulate his thoughts and feelings to his readers.

In “The Tuft of Flowers” frost sight of a butterfly begins him on the thoughts of the worker of the field on the previous day. Frost first describes the butterfly’s flight around the field and causes him to notice a patch of flowers left from the previous day. This evident when he writes, “But he turned first, and led my eye to look at a tall tuft of flowers beside a brook” (pg. 901 Lines 21-22). Then he continues on by stating that the mower must have left that patch of flowers for the rest of nature to enjoy. This is evident when he writes, “The mower in the dew had loved them thus, by leaving them to flourish, not for us” (pg.902 Lines 25-26). This gets Frost to thinking his connection with the butterfly, the mowers connection with the flowers, and fact that alone or not we are all connected together in the way of nature. This is evident when he writes, [”Men work together,” I told him from heart, “Whether they work together or apart.”] (pg. 902 Lines 39-40).

In “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” Frost has stopped to watch the snow fall on this way to accomplish some promises, and reflects on what he might think of as wonderment by his horse. This evident when he writes, “My little horse must think it queer to stop without a farmhouse near between the woods and frozen lake” (pg.923 Lines 5-6). Then he writes about the reaction of the...
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