Robber Barons: Gates, Carnagie, Rockafeller, Vanderbilt

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Robber Barons
The robber barons of the early industrial age, and one modern day baron have been accused of creating monopolies over several different areas. The four barons focused upon are Cornelius Vanderbilt, Andrew Carnegie, Rockefeller, and Bill Gates. They have all created monopolies over their respected industry. These monopolies eliminated all opposition and left consumers with only one choice.

First off is Cornelius Vanderbilt, he built his business with the New York railways. He built the New York Central System by the 1850's, he also produced the largest steamboat fleet in the United States at that time. He created the New York Central from three smaller railroads which he purchased, the expanded from New York City to Buffalo. Eventually his railroads connected all the way through to Chicago in under four years of being in the business. Not only did he run a very large rail system but also became the first to use several different techniques. One was the Westinghouse Air Brakes, which would allow for faster and more reliable brakes as well as being able to ravel at higher speeds. Another idea pioneered was the four track system which would allow for two freight tracks, one for each direction, and two more tracks for passenger cars. The tactics he used were legal, the only thing he did was purchase smaller lines to help expand his railroads. These were not unethical moves just ways to help his business.

Next is Andrew Carnegie, he was born in Scotland in 1835, at thirteen he came to America and began working for a railroad company. Throughout his employment he invested in railroads. At he age of thirty he left and began an iron bridge company. After seven years he decided to start a group of investors who would fund one of the worlds largest and most up to date steel mill. The way he began making steel involved the Bessemer Process along with the open hearth idea. These two inventions soon became industry standard for all steel...
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