Road Rage

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  • Topic: Anger, Driving, Road safety
  • Pages : 5 (1711 words )
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  • Published : May 5, 2013
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Road Rage

Since 1990, it has killed hundreds of people and injured over 10,000. Its victims are from all ages, socioeconomic groups, and areas of the country. What is known as "road rage" is growing at an alarming rate. What is Road Rage?

Road rage, also called intermittent explosive disorder, is a term used to refer to violent incidents resulting from stress caused by accidents or incidents on roadways. It is often a natural extension of aggressive driving. Essentially road rage is aggressive driving – attempting to injure or kill another driver because of a traffic dispute. It involves unusually aggressive responses to a variety of traffic incidents. Road ragers may be upset by minor driving errors, like not using a turn signal, or poor driving habits. They may become enraged by a bigger infraction, like tailgating. They may retaliate with their car by forcing someone off the road, or they may follow the driver until he stops. Then they get out of their car and attack the driver in person. Road rage frustration and aggression are not caused by traffic. It is a learned cultural habit of retaliation when you feel like retaliating. It's a free choice we exercise. When we are frustrated in heavy traffic, we have a choice of how we're going to respond. In its simplest form, road rage occurs when a driver reacts angrily to other drivers, cutting them off, tailgating, gesturing or waving a fist. At its worst, the angry driver may become more aggressive and try to kill or injure another driver. What does it involve?

It involves unusually aggressive responses to a variety of traffic incidents. Road ragers may be upset by minor driving errors, like not using a turn signal, or poor driving habits. They may become enraged by a bigger infraction, like tailgating. They may retaliate with their car by forcing someone off the road, or they may follow the driver until he stops. Then they get out of their car and attack the driver in person. Road rage includes various driver acts and types of behavior. Speeding or aggressive acceleration, cutting others, weaving in and out of traffics, sound the vehicle horn, flashing lights excessively, making rude gestures, shouting verbal abuse, hitting another person, throwing objects outside the vehicle - all of these are considered road rage. Who is involved?

Aggressive drivers can come from both genders, all ages, races and socioeconomic levels. Even persons who are usually mild-mannered can blow their top behind the wheel. These persons may only become mad when they're on the road. However, persons who are typically cynical, rude, angry or aggressive get angry more often. They also tend to rage at home, at work and on the road. What causes road rage?

Since road rage has been a problem for many years, it is curious to know what causes it. Why some drivers cannot hold their nerves while others drive normally? In many occasions road rage is caused by pure anger. Even calm and well behaved people can fall into the road rage trap. If a driver gets irritated by another driver behavior it is likely a road rage at to follow. Simple events such as not showing gratitude gesture after a driver has been let to pass first through a lane can trigger serious road rage response that is likely to lead to serious consequences for all involved in the situation.

Effects
The physical effects of road rage is when anger triggers the body’s fight or flight response. Other emotions that trigger this response include fear, excitement and anxiety. The adrenal glands flood the body with stress hormones, such as adrenaline and cortisol. The brain shunts blood away from the gut and towards the muscles, in preparation for physical exertion. Heart rate, blood pressure and respiration increase, the body temperature rises and the skin perspires. The mind is sharpened and focused.

Health problems that occur is the constant flood of stress chemicals and associated metabolic changes that accompany recurrent unmanaged...
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