Risk Management Plan

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Australian Open 2009


The Australian Open tennis began in 1905, when The Australasian Tennis Championships were first staged at the Warehouseman's Cricket Ground in St Kilda Rd, Melbourne. Until tennis' "Open" era began in 1968, the Australian Championships were held in many different states, and at many different venues around Australia. With the ushering in of Open tennis, the name was changed to the Australian Open, and by 1972, the National Tennis Body decided to give the Australian Open a permanent home and that was Melbourne. More than 500 tennis players from different nations will compete during this event. Along with the players, an estimated 1000 team officials, 2000 hospitality staff, 1500 casual security staff, 1000 sponsors’ staff and 2000 volunteers will attend the event which will be held at three different venues located within the Melbourne area i.e. Rod Laver arena, Vodafone area and Telstra Dome. This event is one of the biggest events in Australia which has a turnover of around 10 – 15 million dollars. To allow Australian Open run effectively with reasonable safety for all users and stakeholders, we needed to identify potential risks that may have had an impact on the provision of its services to the tournament. Our aim is to achieve best practice in controlling all the risks to which Australian Open 2009 is exposed. We will achieve this by identifying our priority exposures, addressing these, incorporating appropriate risk management strategies, risk improvements and contingency planning into our business, monitoring and reviewing ongoing risk to account for changes in our operations and to enable us to make well-informed decisions on risk controls. As the first step of this process, this document outlines the framework for Australian Open 2009 risk management. Within this framework, training will provide appropriate tools and practices for the effective management of risks. The next step will be to build on this framework to further develop risk management plan for the event.


Following on from the success of Australian Open 2008, tournament officials are looking to do even better in 2009 by breaking records for all three venue attendance. As this is the biggest sporting event in the world in January, we want to set world-class benchmarks for the tournament’s look, feel and function. Our priority is to assume risks planning and manage responsibilities to ensure the successful conduct of the event. We want players, fans and viewers to have the best tennis experience of the year. We are looking further to build this reputation in 2009.

The Risk Management team will be directed by the Managing Director, facilitated by Australian Open Tennis Risk Management Steering Committee and carried out by every manager in each area as a core activity. The identification and review of critical risk areas within Australian Open and the implementation of Risk Management Plan will also be the subject of internal audit protocols, to be applied by Internal Audit with the oversight and approval of the Board Audit Committee. All staff, project and program managers are responsible for managing risk within their span of control, for promoting the application of risk management by contractors, and assisting with the identification of global or broadly based risks that could impact on Australian Open as a whole. Business Unit managers are accountable for ensuring that high level risks are managed appropriately through a Business Unit Risk Management Program and included on a Business Unit Risk Register. Medium level risks may be included in the Business Unit Risk Management Plan if appropriate, or, alternatively, managed as an operational issue through the relevant Program. The Business Unit Manager is responsible for overseeing the Business Unit Risk Management Program and endorsing risk...
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