Riising Sea Levels

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Rising Sea Levels: The Impact

Introduction
Gradual increase in temperature known as climate change is causing icebergs to melt and therefore, increasing sea levels, this is basic known fact but what might not be as clear is the effect of rising sea levels on the environment. Amongst the vast variety of issues to do with climate change, its impact on the ocean stood out for me. After I researched the impact of climate change on the ocean, I found that the topic was too broad; therefore I decided to find two sources on rising sea levels and its impact on the environment. My naivety and lack of knowledge on the impacts of rising sea levels such as erosion and provocation of storm surges (Miller et al. 2006) led me to assume the main impact of rising sea levels was on the lines of “we are all going to drown (in Australia)”, and because I can’t swim, this alone was the worst consequence amongst all climate change could bring. In my view because we live in a country bordered by the sea, understanding issued such as rising sea levels and its consequences is very important, because if we are aware of some of these consequences early on we can take action to lessen its negative impacts in the future.

Criteria for Credible Sources
The expertise of Geoscience Australia provides a solid base that gives great credit to the information provided by Geoscience Australia (2012). Geoscience Australia is a well known government agency that provides geoscientific information to enable the government to make decisions on things such as: use of resources and management of environment (Commonwealth of Australia, 2011). Nationwide decisions will have great impact on the world; therefore the Australian government will seek to base its decision on the most accurate scientific research. This means that scientific government agency of Australia is bound to provide accurate information based on scientific research; therefore it is safe to refer to the information provided by Geoscience Australia (2012) as reliable. In addition to that many scholarly sources such as Whiteway and Geoscience Australia (2009) are found where Geoscience Australia is the author. As scholarly sources have gone through rigorous review and critique to provide very credible information, it is suggested that information provided by Geoscience Australia is of high standard, therefore credible. As rising sea levels is a geoscience based issue it means that Geoscience Australia (2012) is providing information in their field of knowledge which gives credit to their information, for example if they were providing information on stars or space we wouldn’t consider their information as credible. The Geoscience Australia (2012) website is a tertiary source of information, but holds reliable information. The information is presented in a logical and organised in a very simple way that everyone can understand which gives the website a professional aura suggesting that it’s a reliable source of information. In addition, the language used is highly formal, free of sensationalism and persuasion which suggests that the website isn’t intending on selling a product or promoting particular views; therefore it is suggested that it isn’t very bias on its views as it is not produced for individual gain. Geoscience Australia (2012) does not use generalisations to support its claims but gives a precise statistical data that is referenced; this gives it great credit as it gives weight to its claim therefore adding to the website’s reliability. The reference list of Geoscience Australia (2012) contains three correctly Vancouver referenced sources but two broken hyperlinks which suggests that research has been done to put it together but the information gained from the hyperlinks are either out of date or unreliable. Overall if one was forced to use a website as a source for an assignment this website is reliable enough to at least not give extremely inaccurate information.

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