Right to Work Laws

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THE EFFECTS OF RIGHT TO WORK LAWS.

IS IT RIGHT FOR MICHIGAN?

March 9, 2012

INTRODUCTION:

Should our state adopt a right-to-work law? This is a hot topic that continues to be contested all over the United States. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the right-to-work law is good for the state of Michigan. If ever passed in Michigan, the right-to-work law would guarantee that no person could be compelled, as a condition of employment, to join or to pay dues to a labor union. Supporters of right-to-work laws point to research that say that right-to-work laws have a positive effect on states that adopt them while opponents of right-to-work laws do just the opposite.

EMPLOYEES AND RIGHT-TO-WORK LAWS
According to an article written by Michael Lafaive, research shows that states with right-to-work laws arguably are better off economically. Supporters also contend that these laws create jobs by attracting businesses, improve union accountability, lead to higher wages, and even go as far as saying they are morally right because they stop people from having to support a cause in which they don’t believe. On February 1, 2012, the state of Indiana became America’s 23rd right-to-work state. Supporters of the right-to-work laws say that “Michigan may need to adopt such a law to better compete for jobs and talent” (Lafaive, 2012). Further supporting this issue Thomas Holmes authored a study that “examined manufacturing employment in border counties of neighboring states where one state had right-to-work protections and the other did not. He found manufacturing employment as a percentage of county population increased by one-third in the counties within the right-to-work states compared to those in the non-right-to-work states. In a 2010 study by economist Richard Vedder, an adjunct scholar with the Mackinac Center, found that “40 percent of Americans...
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