Rh Bill

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I am a relatively new Twitter user. I don’t really tweet much. As a matter of fact, the reason why I created my Twitter account was to follow the RH Bill trend. That was a few months back. Since then, I’ve managed to tweet even stuff not related to the RH Bill.

Yesterday, I started tweeting about it again. A thirty-something woman started a tweet debate with me on the subject. Our tweet-versations covered the economics of the RH Bill up to its healthcare promises. We reached a point where this woman tweeted about unwanted teen pregnancies. She said that the RH Bill would prevent such a thing from happening. I replied by pointing out that unwanted teen pregnancies happen because of lack of discipline and virtue. She replies to this, saying that she doesn’t care what unmarried couples do, that it’s “nobody else’s business.” And then I replied, “So, it’s okay for you to have your daughter going around having sex with anyone she likes?”

And then there was silence.

She didn’t reply anymore to that tweet. She, instead, went off pursuing another line of argumentation.

Why the silence?

Is this the point where morals fail?

With the Catholic Church now strongly praying and gathering support against the RH Bill, I will try to give my two cents on the matter, perhaps without talking about Catholic doctrine (I myself am a Catholic and I believe and understand the Church’s doctrine on why the RH Bill, especially its points on contraceptive promotion, is immoral).

I will attempt to talk about the RH Bill as an ordinary, tax-paying citizen who is not rich, and who belongs to a happy family of now 6 children (my mom just gave birth to my 5th sibling).

Why am I not pro-RH?

Main answer: It’s the wrong solution to the right problems.

Anyone who has been following the RH debate would know that the original premise of the proponents of the bill was this: overpopulation is the cause of poverty in the Philippines. Now, this premise has become...
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