Revolutionary War

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The American Revolutionary War was the largest turning point in the history of the United States. Without winning the war, the United States would have never existed as an independent nation. The American Colonists dealt with so much pain and nonsense from King George in Great Britain. By 1774, the American colonists were fed up with the King and all of his unconstitutional actions. Many events contributed to the departure or separation from Britain, but after the Boston Tea Party, the major and most influential reason of separation from Great Britain began with the Intolerable Acts, also known as the Coercive Acts. This Act not only violated the rights of the American people, but they limited all daily living in the colonies. When this violation occurred, the American Colonists knew their final destination was to separate from Great Britain. The Intolerable Acts were passed in 1774 to punish the colonists for the Boston Tea Party. There were three major acts involved that angered the colonists. These three parts violated the rights of the American colonists and people and set the stage for separation. The first part of the Intolerable Acts was the Boston Port Bill. Going in to effect on June 1, 1774, it closed the Boston Harbor until the people of Boston paid for the tea that they threw into the harbor. The Administration of Justice Act became effective May 20th and it did not allow British soldiers to be tried in the colonies for any crimes they might commit. This meant the soldiers could do anything they wanted since they would probably not be punished for their crimes (Meltzer 32). Not only was this unfair to the residents of the colonies because many crimes could be committed without just action to punish the soldiers, it was unfair for the American colonists. They would not be allowed to take action against these soldiers to protect the American Colonies. A large part of the Intolerable Acts was the Massachusetts Government Act, which also took effect on...
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