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Review "We Have No Right to Happiness"

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Review "We Have No Right to Happiness"

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Review on We have No “Right to Happiness”
By: C.S. Lewis

In class we read three different essays including ‘The Dying family’ by J.H. Plumb,’ Does Fatherhood Make You Happy?’ By Daniel Gilbert, and ‘We Have No Right to Happiness’ by C.S. Lewis. Though the purpose of these essays can be very controversial to some, after reviewing all three essays I have picked my favorite, or the one I agree with and disagree with most.

‘We have no Right to Happiness’ makes a very good argument on the point the author is trying to make. Some people believe that happiness is a right and is supposed to be given out, or is required to be provided by the government, like a right. In all reality that is true, but to an extent, we do have a right to happiness; we also have a right to earn happiness. We are all provided with the resources to do so. As in all rights we are provided with there still is some kind of boundary. We have freedom of speech, but yet we could not just walk up to president Obama, cuss him out, and get away with it. We have the right to bear arms; under certain circumstances. Therefore every right can be justified.

One of the points the author makes is “it has been laid down that one of the rights of man is a right to the ‘pursuit of happiness’.” As I said before, this statement can be translated in several different ways, I took it as we have the opportunity to make ourselves and others happy but it is up to us to grasp it and follow through with it. Happiness that is earned is a lot more fulfilling then happiness that is provided, in my opinion. Saying that happiness is a right just doesn’t settle in my mind. Now I’m not saying that you should ruin other people’s happiness to create your own as Mr. A did causing his wife to commit suicide after leaving her, but within reason, do what you got to do. Mrs. A was just as entitled to happiness as Mr. A, she just didn’t act on it.

Another valid point the author makes is “A right to happiness...