Response to Bernard Crick's Article: the Savage Satire of ‘1984’ Still Speaks to Us Today

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I agree with the position Bernard Crick took in his article “The savage satire of ‘1984’ still speaks to us today”. Although the world made it through the year 1984 successfully without any Big Brother trouble, no one knows if something so controlling could actually be realistic one day. No one knows what can happen in the future. The scary thing is, ‘the future’ can be anywhere from tomorrow, to five hundred years from now allowing that hint of fear to stay present. It seems that everything in the Big Brother world is satiric or ironic. From the first paragraph of the book, the reader sees that everything Winston Smith endures is pessimistic. The first paragraph of the book tells the reader of the "swirl of gritty dust...The hallway smelt of boiled cabbage and old rag mats." Just from these few lines George Orwell makes it clear that there was absolutely nothing victorious about Victory Mansions. Hate week, for example, is a big event in Oceania. The people prepare for it like Christmas. Instead of jolly songs with family and friends over eggnog, Hate week is celebrated with fists in the air while chanting about death, Goldstein, and whatever the party wanted the citizens to hate.

Orwell’s intentions with the book 1984 were to scare people into thinking someone or something such as the party could take over the world we live in. The world has already experienced something relative to Big Brother called hardcore communism with Russia and Cuba so with that, lays the possibility of a modern day Big Brother. Crick also talks about the proles being the least monitored in 1984, but it is also true in modern day society. The working class, higher skilled people, or people of authority are more closely observed throughout society because they are worth more than a regular person. It is more shocking for the A+ student to be caught breaking the rules than a regular, average high-school student. Over all Bernard Crick is saying that he feels as though the idea of 1984...
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