Residential School

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Running Head: RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL BIOGRAPHY

Residential School Biography

Running Head: RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL BIOGRAPHY
Treaties were signed by the Aboriginal people in the year of 1872, when the European settlers came to Canada. The negotiation lead into another subject in which they would build a residential school for the children of the Aboriginal people where they can help them in improving their economic and social practices. They negotiated with the Aboriginal people of Canada about sharing the land with both parties benefiting from its resources. British, Europeans including the church itself felt that they have the responsibility to help the Aboriginal People in following or incorporating how they run their political, economic and social customs. They were promised that in signing the treaty, they would still be able to continue preserving their culture, traditions, ceremonies and anything that deals with their way of living and beliefs, which was the opposite of what Residential Schools had brought the children. This leads the Aboriginal people in signing the contract known as Treaty.

The First Nations believed that the lands they have were created to be shared, not owned. The Europeans made allies with First Nations through gift giving. The treaty was an agreement to share the land as equals. They saw treaties as ways to secure lands. The treaties were understood to be legacies that bring peace, harmony and ways to show respect. The intent of the treaty was that they’d be given land and would not be interfered with. Inside Residential School, it was agreed on that they would teach the children how to cook, dew, how to solve mathematical problems, how to speak other language mainly English, how to farm and make a use of their lands and resources.

When Residential Schools were built in the year of 1800’s, the Aboriginal people were shocked because of the fact that it was not built anywhere on...
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