Research on Student Time Management

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RESEARCH ON STUDENT TIME MANAGEMENT IN A PRIVATE COLLEGE
* TIME MANAGEMENT FACTOR
* EFFECTIVE TIME MANAGEMENT ON ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE
* DEALING WITH PROCRASTINATION
* EFFECTIVE TIME MANAGEMENT ON OTHER PSYCHO – EDUCATION VARIABLES * RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TIME MANAGEMENT & STRESS
* TIME MANAGEMENT & GENDER
TIME MANAGEMENT
1. STAYING MOTIVATED AND AVOIDING PROCRASTINATION
Introduction: why it is important to understand motivation and procrastination As an independent, self-directed student you will, by now, be getting used to ways of organising, managing and balancing your study and personal life. In addition to the art of planning effectively by setting clear goals and prioritising, as covered in the unit, 'Planning: setting goals and prioritising', the unit, 'Organising and managing your time', identified ways of developing a better sense of control over time through the act of scheduling. However, the story does not end there! At the end of the latter unit you had a chance to review your schedule and assess your progress. You may have discovered that you are wasting time, have difficulty staying motivated or spend a lot of time procrastinating. It is natural to lose some of your motivation and enthusiasm from time to time when a project lasts as long as a degree. This is not something to worry about but it does need to be addressed. This unit will provide some strategies to help you to increase your motivation, work more effectively, and gain a more positive outlook on your university experience. Content in this unit can be transferred to a wide range of situations throughout your life. It is important to point out that the guidelines provided in this unit are introductory and generic (in so far as that is possible!). As you read through each of the issues and strategies outlined below, you need to be aware of your discipline-specific context and assess the relevance of the strategies presented. All learning skills should ideally be developed within the particular parameters of your discipline(s). As you engage in the university learning experience you will progressively develop knowledge of subject-specific discourse, and through participating in it come to understand its particular conventions. In the meantime, if in doubt, check with your lecturers. Learning objectives

At the end of this you will understand:
* what motivation is
* why it is important
* the factors that affect motivation (including procrastination) * how to apply possible remedial strategies
* how to establish whether or not these strategies are suitable for your subject-area * how to recognise if you need further help in this regard Do you find it difficult to follow through on goals you have set? Is it problematic for you to keep to your time schedule/planner? Do you find it hard to start assignments?

Do you feel lethargic and unenthusiastic when you sit down to study? If you have answered yes to some or all of the above questions you may benefit from working through this unit. * What is motivation?

Motivation is a pre-requisite for all human action. Put simply, it is a person’s ability to find the energy to achieve a chosen goal. Often it is a case of necessity. For example, the principal reason we are motivated to learn our native language is that we would not survive socially or even physically without some form of verbal communication. There are two basic types of motivation as follows.

* Intrinsic motivation
This is the desire to do something for the sake of doing it e.g. reading a book because you find it interesting and enjoyable. It implies a willingness to learn for its own sake. * Extrinsic motivation

In this situation the drive to do something comes from outside e.g. completing a task to receive a reward or avoid punishment. In this case you might read a book because you do not want to fail an exam. The better kind of motivation is usually the former (intrinsic),...
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