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INDUSTRIAL AND ECONOMIC SOCIOLOGY 2

RESEARCH PROPOSAL

2012
Lelethu Sinovuyo Hlati
G10h0267
5/28/2012
INDUSTRIAL AND ECONOMIC SOCIOLOGY 2

RESEARCH PROPOSAL

2012
Lelethu Sinovuyo Hlati
G10h0267
5/28/2012

Contents
Introduction2
Literature Review4
Research Design5
(a) Population5
(b) Conceptualization6
(c) Method of data collection7
Data collection7
Interview7
Questionnaires8
Sampling Methods8
(c) Methods of data presentation and analysis9
Ethics appraisal10
Significance of the project11
Resources Required12
Time Schedule12
Appendices13
(a)Reference List13
(b)Pilot work report14
(c)Research instrumentsError! Bookmark not defined.
(d)Letters of access, support, permission, etc.Error! Bookmark not defined.

Introduction
It is known that all South Africans have the right to a basic education which includes adult basic education and further education as well. According to the Bill of Rights of the country's Constitution, the state has an obligation, through reasonable measures, to progressively make this education available and accessible to all South African citizens. Since 2009, the national Department of Education has been split into two ministries: Basic Education, and Higher Education and Training. Each ministry is responsible for its level of education across the country as a whole, while each of the nine provinces has its own education department which is known as being responsible for province. On the one hand, the Ministry of Basic Education focuses on primary and secondary education, as well as early childhood development centres. On the other hand, the Ministry of Higher Education and Training is responsible for tertiary education up to doctorate level, technical and vocational training, as well as adult basic education and training. The central government provides a national framework for school policy, but administrative responsibility lies with the provinces (meaning the respective departments of each province). Power is further devolved to grassroots level via elected school governing bodies (SGB), which consists of members of that specific community, some staff , members as well as parents who have learners in that particular school. The SGB is understood as having a significant say in the running of their schools. Private schools and higher education institutions have a fair amount of autonomy, but are expected to fall in line with certain government non-negotiable rules and regulations, for example; no child may be excluded from a school on grounds of his or her race or religion. The South African matric pass rate has raised many questions about the department of education on a national level. According to statistics South Africa, the statistics were as follows:

In the following year (2011) they were at 70.2%, nation-wide. Whenever the topic of the education system is raised, I often wonder about several issues, particularly, these past couple of days as there have been many thoughts that have crossed my mind, especially when I, myself had experienced what I thought were mere exaggerations. Coming from what society considers a “model C” school and a family that survived every day, financially I mean, I feel as though I was not exposed to the many issues surrounding the education system and its respective departments of my own country and being at Rhodes University which is situated in, what many could refer to as a poverty stricken town. I have seen, heard and recently experienced a lot. At this stage it may already be clear that in this essay’s topic will be on the education system of South Africa, the changes that have happened since 1994 and comparing it to the era in which we as a country had not become a democratic country and now. This topic appealed to me as I have heard many elders proclaiming that ‘thing’ were much easier before 1994 and others claiming otherwise. There have been stories that...
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