Representations of 'Scape' in Art

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  • Topic: Art, Contemporary art, Land art
  • Pages : 4 (1233 words )
  • Download(s) : 47
  • Published : May 26, 2006
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It seems that nowadays artists are no longer limiting themselves to representing their surroundings by simply sketching or photographing them, exactly as they are. Contemporary art is now promoting a new concept, that encourages the artist to interpret their surroundings and depict them in their own unique way – a concept known as, Scape.

‘Scape' is rapidly becoming more popular than ever in contemporary art, which I believe is due to its diversity and the ability it gives artists to ‘escape' into their own worlds; real or not – and represent it, in their own unique way.

With scape, the artist has no limitations and is offered more freedom for self expression – artworks can be based upon imagination, dream or reality and are often greatly influenced by the artists own beliefs and perceptions.

The different ways in which scape is represented therefore are infinite. The only real boundary on the way in which scape can represented is the artists imagination and own choice – while some artists may choose to portray their surroundings in a more abstract way, others may simply choose to sketch, for example, a mountain.

Scape also enables the viewer the opportunity to better interpret what the artist feels about their surroundings – i.e. if the artist perceives something in a negative way, we can almost surely conclude that the way in which they portray that something, will be in a negative manner (using dark colours, distorting etc.)

This form of art is very easily manipulated, so as to represent what the artist wants according to his/her perceptions, beliefs, ideologies etc. An example of this can be seen in Brett Whiteley's, Van Gough inspired, Night Café (1972).

Whiteley studied Van Gough for a number of years and he says that during this period of his life as an artist his perceptions of his surroundings changed significantly, which lead him to create the Van Gough inspired series. Brett Whiteley – Night Café (1972)...
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