Report to Wordsworth and Flower-Fed Buffaloes

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Literature
Poetry

Compare and contrast the portrayal of nature in “Report to Wordsworth” and “The Flower-Fed Buffaloes”

Both poets of “ Report to Wordsworth” and “The Flower-Fed Buffaloes” depict nature in their poems in different ways as well as similar ways with the usage of imagery, figurative devices and through the structure. Vachel Lindsay talks about the approaching of modernization and its wreckage to the natural environment, including the buffaloes. Boey Kim Cheng is informing about the disintegration of nature by man to ‘Wordsworth,’ who is the father of Romanticism. The tone in “The Flower-Fed Buffaloes” is sadness and nostalgic and in “ Report to Wordsworth” it is devastation. In both poems nature is revealed with numerous examples of imagery. In these poems the destruction of nature is being described differently. In “Flower-Fed Buffaloes,” Lindsay uses buffaloes and associates spring to portray nature and in “report to Wordsworth”, Cheng talks about the general destruction of nature with imagery associated with pollution and sea water, which has to do with the corruption of the water and land of the sea. In addition, “The Flower-Fed Buffaloes” nature is portrayed in a positive way, to compare the transformation of there being no more buffaloes. For example, the line Lindsay uses, “tossing, blooming, perfumed grass” to show how the wonderful ‘flowers’ the buffaloes fed on were always there but the buffaloes were gone. The word ‘perfumed’ enables the reader to imagine the amazing scents given off by the flowers and the word ‘tossing’ allows the reader to see the flowers swaying through the wind. “With the Blackfeet, lying low, With the Pawnees, lying low” enables the reader to imagine the destruction of nature as the native American tribes that once herded the buffaloes, were just sitting there as a result of the ‘locomotives’ which caused the buffaloes to leave. This is similar to the line used by Cheng, “the birds are few in a sky...
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