Renewable Energy

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Moving Towards Green Conservation
For a long time now, nations around the world have often relied on coal, oil, and natural gas to supply their energy needs. Unfortunately, the dependence on fossil fuels has created a serious issue. Fossil fuels are a limited resource and eventually will deplete or become too expensive to find those that remain. These fuels also cause pollution and give off greenhouse gases that shape global warming. Nonetheless, there is an alternative way to protect our natural resources. So what is renewable energy? Renewable energy is energy that stems from our planet’s biological resources and is a crucial part to the development of the environment. This energy includes solar, wind, hydro, geothermal heat, and biomass. Solar energy generates electricity through natural sunlight. Wind results from air currents that spin wind turbines to generate power. Hydro energy is falling or flowing water that generates water turbines for power as well. Geothermal is the force produced by heat from geysers located inside the Earth’s core. Lastly, biomass is energy made from wood, animal or other organic wastes and methane gas in landfills. These resources are significant because they do not contaminate the atmosphere with carbon-based agents. Utilizing these natural resources initially may not be cost effective, although using harmful resources would prove to be costly in the long run. Thus, renewable energy appears to be the better choice. In addition, there are implied cost savings on health factors, such as living longer and reducing the impact of chronic diseases. The weighty advantage of renewable energy is sustainability of natural resources and the decrease in global warming or emission pollution. With this movement, our economy will eventually experience a financial surplus. Renewable energy offers cleaner options than traditional fuels can. The Free Market and Environmental Responsibility

In today’s competitive global economy, environmentally conscious organizations are seeking ways to enhance resource management, reduce expenses, and increase profits through effective operational methods. One of the ways companies can participate in environmental responsibility is by obtaining renewable energy. Businesses collaborate with the ecosystem at many different levels. They habitually use natural resources, process them for human consumption, and dispose by-products back into the environment. Moreover, for some, businesses activities are the root of most environmental problems—global warming, air pollution, soil erosion, species extinction, etc. However, if corporations are the ones to blame, they can become the problem solver as well. They should be concerned with environmental issues and economic issues, and what affects the economy affects business. Renewable energy represents positive advances for entrepreneurs. In particular, creating more jobs and stimulating the economy. The most influential aspect of business’ responsibility to the environment comes from the free market approach to economics. According to Adam Smith’s theory, the people have control over the marketplace without government interference. In his book, “The Wealth of Nations,” he states, “Every individual... neither intends to promote the public interest, nor knows how much he is promoting it...he intends only his own security; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain, and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention” (Book IV, Chapter II, p. 194). In a free enterprise, a corporate executive is employed by the business owners, otherwise known as shareholders. He or she has direct financial responsibility to the shareholders. Executives must accomplish company affairs while taking into consideration the bottom line, which is making as much money as...
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