Renewable Energy

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RENEWABLE ENERGY IN MALAYSIA

BY
MOHD HAIRINIZAM ABDUL KARIM
FACULTY OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
UITM, ARAU PERLIS

FOR
ENCIK KAMSOL MOHAMED KASSIM
LECTURER
ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING (MKT 665)
FACULTY BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
UITM, ARAU PERLIS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

This assignment is to meet the learning needs of the subjet of MKT 665 (Environmental Marketing). MKT 665 is one of the subjects taught in the modules for the study of the Faculty of Business Administration (Marketing).

In completing this task, the various challenges encountered especially on time restrictions, basic work, family and the time to complete the assignment given. But with the guidance, instruction and assisstance especially from Encik Kamsol, friends and family, finally I have finished this assignment

I would like to acknowledge all the people who have provided all the feedback to this assignment including Encik Kamsol, friends and family.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTABSTRACT| | iiiii1|
INTRODUCTION| | 1|
LITERATURE REVIEWi.Wind Powerii.Hydro Poweriii.Solar Energyiv.Bio Energyv.Geothermal Energy| | 34568| CONCLUSION| | 9|
BIBLIOGRAPHY| | 11|

Abstract

This paper will look into the Renewable Energy that is seemed the suitable replacement of the current energy supply in Malaysia. Malaysian government has been looking the right replacement of current energy that has been used which in long term will be depleted. The renewable energy is suitable to use because renewable energy technologies are clean sources of energy that have a much lower environmental impact than conventional energy technologies. To cope with the economical and industrial growth, the demand of energy is growing very rapidly.

Introduction

Renewable energy is one of the energy that has been the main consideration to replace the current energy usage by the Malaysian Government under the Fuel Diversification Policy that was set out in 2001 is seeking to intensify the development of renewable energy, particularly biomass, as the 'fifth fuel' resource under the policy. The policy had a target of renewable energy providing 5% of electricity generation by 2005, equal to between 500 and 600 megawatt (MW) of installed capacity. The policy has been reinforced by fiscal incentives, such as investment tax allowances and the Small Renewable Energy Programme (SREP), which encourages the connection of small renewable power generation plants to the national grid (Business Monitor International, 2008).

The Small Renewable Energy Program allows renewable projects with up to 10 MW of capacity to sell their electricity output to TNB, under 21-year licence agreements. Numerous applications for the program have been received, mainly involving biomass, and of these over half are for palm oil waste. In 2005 there were 28 approved biomass projects involving the installation of 194 MW of grid-connected capacity. There were also four approved landfill gas-based projects, with 9 MW of capacity, and 18 mini hydro-electric projects offering 69.9 MW of total capacity (Business Monitor International, 2008).

Malaysia is one of the most developing countries among ASEAN countries next to Singapore, with GDP of US$15,400 per capita, and steady GDP growth of 4.6% in 2009 (IMF, 2010). Malaysian economy grew at 5% in 2005 and overall energy demand is expected to increase at an average rate of 6% per annum (Saidur, 2009). In parallel with Malaysia’s rapid economic development, final energy consumption grew at rate of 5.6% from 2000 to 2005 and reached 38.9 Megatonne of Oil Equivalent (Mtoe) in 2005. The final energy consumption is expected to reach 98.7 Mtoe in 2030, nearly three times the 2002 level. The industrial sector will have the highest growth rate of 4.3 percent. Industrial sector accounted for some 48% of total energy use in 2007 which represents the highest percentage. It is estimated that the natural gas reserve is...
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