Religion Traditions

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eligion traditions

Religion Traditions
Terika Jenkins
REL/134
November 17, 2012
Jack Batchelor

Religion Traditions
Religious traditions play a huge role with humans and their beliefs of who controls the world. Religion is believed to have many different meanings to different people. The definition of religion varies but the common definition is people in an organization that to worship together and have the same beliefs. It is also viewed a system of belief that worships a God or gods, prayer, and moral code. In this paper, you will read explanation of how religious traditions describe and encourage relationships, the key characteristics of religion, and the conflict issues in the study of religion (Molloy, 2010). A relationship with the divine is believed to be very vibrant, lively, and real. It may feel abstract to some people, but there is power in shaping this relationship. It is never too late to begin a relationship with the divine. Establishing a relationship and obligating time to share with the divine is the main key to any religion. Praying, meditating, studying the Bible, Veda, Quran, or spending time with nature are some ways to build a relationship with the divine. For example, praying is very important to Christians and is a spiritual method used to communicate with God (Molloy, 2010). A relationship with sacred time can be viewed different ways, depending on the religion. Christianity, Islam, and Judaism believe time is starting in a straight line from beginning to the end of the universe. Time is considered to be very important, limited, and unrepeatable. Buddhism believes time is cyclical; meaning the world moves through endless and changes constantly. In this case, time is not critical because the world is not moving to some ending point. The relationship with sacred time has a better outcome because they appreciate the present or time more than being oriented to the future (Molloy, 2010). A relationship with sacred space or the...
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