Regulatory Focus Theory and Two-thousand Private Surveillance

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  • Topic: Regulatory Focus Theory, Surveillance, Mass surveillance
  • Pages : 3 (849 words )
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  • Published : April 30, 2013
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Jennifer Sumey
Professor Gunther
English 1010
9 September 2010

Persuading Us Of Surveillance

In today’s world everyone sees surveillance as a positive aspect towards security. In William Staples’s “Everyday Surveillance” he challenges himself to convince his unaware educated readers that there is a downside to surveillance. He wants to inform his readers on things they most likely do not know about. Throughout his writing he is very persuasive, his use of surprising yet unknown facts, the way he gets his reader’s emotions running and his serious tone hooks his audience into believing the way he perceives surveillance to be in our everyday lives.

Right away Staples throws out some surprising facts that are shocking to hear to tries to get his reader’s thinking. As Staples tests you with these unknown facts, he wants his audience to seriously consider whether surveillance is a positive or negative thing. As he lays down the facts that he wants to present, he creates a sense of wonder in all of his readers’ minds. In paragraph two, Staples points out, “In New York City, more than two-thousand private surveillance cameras are taping citizens on public streets” (250). This is cause for concern if sat and thought upon, not being able to walk down the street or drive a car without being watched makes a person wonder what surveillance really is. Humans naturally love their privacy and when that is violated they get angry and even scared. The facts the author brings forth are the one’s that will potentially scare people. When people are scared they automatically become concerned about the different possibilities surveillance could accomplish. He persuades his audience by hooking them with these facts they are not informed with, and gets you on his side by seeing the downside of surveillance, and by putting things like this in your head he is proving his point that much easier.

Staples is also really good about getting his audience’s emotions flowing not...
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