Registered Nursing as a Career

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Registered Nursing as a Career
Registered nurses are medically trained individuals who care for patients in different settings. Registered nurses implement the patients’ care plan. Nursing duties include dispensing medicine, recording patients’ past medical history, and observe reactions to treatments – not parallel/see pg. 24-26 in FAQs (US Department of Labor, 2008). According to Tracy Ingram (personal communication, October 29, 2008) registered nurses are not legally not permitted to change the patients’ care plan; only a physician can make adjustments. The nurse informs the physician of the patients’ symptoms and reactions to the care plan. The physician uses this information to make an adequate care plan. Any student who is thinking about becoming a nurse should be a caring, responsible individual. Nursing can be a stressful job requiring good communication skills and maturity. A nurse must put aside his/her emotions to be able to handle emergency situations.

To become a registered nurse there are several pathways a student could pick – use stronger/more precise vocab.. Many traditional colleges offer a four year Bachelor of Science degree in nursing, while smaller community colleges offer an Associate of science degree in nursing. With either degree, a student could become a registered nurse. Another option is to become a licensed practical nurse first, and then find a school who that offers a program for licensed practical nurses to transition to a registered nurse. A final option is to find a hospital that has a program for nursing. Certain hospitals offer a short brief nursing program that awards the student a diploma upon completion. These programs are becoming less available every year. Students who attend these programs have a difficult time finding jobs, and continuing their education – not parallel. Traditional colleges do not accept credits from hospital programs (personal communication, October 29, 2008). Once a person has completed his/her degree he/she must pass a state licensing exam, NCLEX-RN. Most states require all healthcare professionals to renew their licenses every 2-4 years (US Department of Labor, 2008).A majority of states require nurses to complete a set number of hours of continuing education before they are allowed to renew their state license (US Department of Labor, 2008). Every state has different laws regulations on licensing. Many states are trying to join together to make requirements the same so a nurse can be registered in all states instead of individual states.

According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, a registered nurse can specialize in different aspects – odd word choice of nursing. Registered nurses can specialize in a particular area like the intensive critical care unit or the emergency room. A registered nurse can choose a disease to work with, like addiction. Specialty faculties hire nurses to care for the patients. A nurse can specialize in a specific population like neonatal, pediatrics or geriatrics. A traveling registered nurse is hired by an agency and goes to a city where there is a nursing shortage. A traveling nurse could be in one city for a week, a month or even a year (US Department of Labor, 2008). Work on source integration – review pg. 158-166 in FAQs

There are many places an individual with a nursing degree can work with a nursing degree – poor syntax. The most common places are a hospital, doctor’s office, and a nursing home. These places represent the more traditional nursing jobs. Less common places to work as a nurse are a school, military job, or a correction facility – not parallel (US Department of Labor, 2008). A registered nurse working in a hospital or nursing home could work almost any time of the day or nightshift?. Most of those environments need nurses for 24-hour coverage because the type of care they offer the patients – poor syntax. Since hospitals and nursing homes are 24-hour care faculties, most nurses would be required to...
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