Regional Variation of English Pronunciation

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Ministry of Education, Science, Youth and Sports of Ukraine
Ivan Franko National University of Lviv

English Department

Regional Variation of English Pronunciation

Course paper
presented by Halina Ihnatiuk
a forth-year studen of the
English department

Supervised by
S.R. Avramenko
an associate professor
of the English department

Lviv-2011
Table of Contents
Introduction ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3 Chapter 1. English Spelling. The Distinction between Phoneme and Alophone-----------------------------------------------------------------------------5 Chapter 2. The Development of the Language in the Process of the Development of the Country --------------------------------------------------------------------10 2.1. The Speech Areas of the United States of America -----------------------14 Chapter 3. Regional Variation of the Pronunciation in the USA ------------------------19 Conclusion ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 25 Summary----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------28 References -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------30

Introduction
The objective of the paper is to examine the preliminary results of different variants of American pronunciation in various regions. As we know there are two major types of English generally accepted around the world. They are British English and American English. The first type of the language is the form of English used in the United Kingdom. The second one – in the United States. Within these two variants of English we also distinguish different dialects and variations of some peculiar words and the way we pronounce them. It is the purpose of the present investigation to study how we pronounce words in different regions of the same country, namely the United States of America. This study sets out to identify how many regions we can extract from the whole country and how many variants of spoken American English we can point out. Regional dialects in the United States typically reflect the elements of the language of the main immigrant groups in any particular region of the country, especially in terms of pronunciation and vernacular vocabulary. Scholars have distinguished at least four major regional variations of spoken American English: Northern,

Southend,
Midland
Western.
After the American Civil War, the settlement of the western territories by migrants from the east led to dialect mixing and levelling, so that regional dialects are most strongly differentiated in the eastern parts of the country that were settled earlier. Localized dialects also exist with quite distinct variations, such as in New York. An unofficial standard for spoken American English has also developed, as a result of mass media and geographic and social mobility, and broadly describes the English typically heard from network newscasters, commonly referred to as non-regional diction, although local newscasters tend toward more parochial forms of speech. Despite this unofficial standard, regional variations of American English hav not only persisted but have actually intensified. British and American English are the reference norms for English as spoken, written, and taught in the rest of the world. For instance the English-speaking members of the Commonwealth often closely follow British English forms while many new American English forms quickly become familiar outside of the United States. Although most dialects of English used in the former British Empire outside of North America are, to various extents, based on British English, most of the countries concerned have developed their own unique dialects, particularly with respect to pronunciation, idioms and vocabulary. Also we can...
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