Reflective Account for Nvq3 Health and Social Care

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Links toDate of Activity:Links to:
Unit refElement refPC refPerformance evidenceScope / range refKnowledge / understand ref

31

31

31

D
C

A
D
C

A

B
C

C
A
B

C
A
B
B

C
B

C
B

A

A

B
B
B
C

D
B
D
C
A
1
6

1
8,3,2
6

4B

9,7
4.A/B/C
2
2
3/4

4.B/C
3
2
1.B/7

1B
1.A

4A
1.B/2

1

5A

7
6
4.A/B/C

1
10
6/4/3
6
6
I was asked by the care manager to explain to Mr D, the changes in the way his benefits would be paid to him when the government changed from benefit books to Post Office accounts. Mr D has poor vocal skills and at times it can be difficult for staff to understand what he saying. I knew from experience and by reading Mr D’s care plans that it was very important to be patient with Mr D and to continually reassure him as he could become very frustrated if he thought that staff could not understand what he was trying to say. I also noted that Mr D had a very good relationship with the Deputy Manager as they had known each other for 15 years, and that the deputy manager could understand Mr D at times when other members of staff could not. I asked deputy manager to sit in the meeting with myself and Mr D. I asked Mr D if he would be happy to have our meeting in the managers office as I thought it would be quiet there and have less interruptions. Making it easier to hear what Mr D said as he tends to mumble. Mr D agreed to this. I sat opposite Mr D , facing him so I could see his facial expressions, with the deputy manager sitting by his side. I have a Scottish accent, so I realised the importance of talking slowly and clearly so Mr D could understand me. I begun by asking some general questions to try and put Mr D at ease. Mr D doesn’t mind repeating himself if you haven’t understood him the first time, and usually when he does repeat himself his speech is much louder and clearer, but he does get frustrated if he has to say the same thing over and over again, so it is very important to concentrate on what he is saying so as to avoid this situation arising. I explained the change in the method of Mr D’s benefit payments, making sure I constantly reassured Mr d that it would make no difference to the amount of money he would receive each week. I had to explain it 3 times before Mr D began to accept the situation, but I also knew that any change in Mr D’s personal circumstances usually result in him becoming anxious , so I told that if he was unsure about anything we discussed, he was welcome to approach any member of staff who would go over the details with him again. From experience and from reading his care plans, I knew that this would play on Mr D’s mind and that he would ask every member of staff why these changes were being implemented, and that he would need a lot of reassurance over the next few days until he became comfortable with the situation. I put a copy of the main points of the meeting in Mr D’s care plan, and put an entry in the diary book for all members of staff to read, so they would be able to put Mr d’s mind at rest when he approached the about his benefit changes. I also asked all staff to monitor Mr D closely over the next few days for any signs of anxiety.

A

B

C

D

scope c

scope a

scope d

KS2a, 3,

KS 17

KS 9/
369 KS 16

KS 11
369 KS 17
KS2
369 KS 4

KS10
369 KS
17

KS 12
KS 16

KS 19

I confirm that the evidence listed is true.

Assessor/Expert/Witness * signature……………………………..Date……………….…….. *Delete as appropriate
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