Reflections and Personal Development

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Unit 052
Engage in Personal Development in Health and Social Care or Children’s and Young Peoples Settings

Outcome 1
Understand what is required for competence in own work role

1.
There are a huge range of jobs within the Early years sector, and the duties and responsibilities of these roles vary enormously. So it is important that you understand what is required of you in your own specific job role.

This will be set out in your job description issued by the setting. The duties and responsibilities will often be expressed as tasks. For an example, if you are working in baby room of a nursery, tasks listed on your job description may include: - meet the emotional and physical care needs of babies sensitively. - make regular observations and assessment of the development of babies.

Often there is an additional ‘person specification’ section of a job description. This details the knowledge, experience and attributes that the practitioner will need to fulfil the duties and responsibilities. This may include things such as: - the ability to interact with babies with sensitivity and respect - experience of meeting the emotional and physical care needs of babies - excellent knowledge and understanding of the development patterns of babies.

Duties which I carry out at my setting are :
- Care for children and young people and babies throughout the day -Feeding, including bottle feeds
-changing nappies
-observations, following the EYFS
-cleaning duties such as hovering and mopping.

2.
When the settings are devising their job descriptions and person specifications, they will consider the relevant standards that they expect their new staff member to meet. Settings will not reach the minimum standards required of them if the practitioners they employ are not up to scratch. The standards that will be considered are shown below: * Codes of practice

* Regulations
* Minimum standards
* National occupational standards
* Quality assurance scheme standards
* Organizational ethos or principles, e.g. Montessori or Steiner

Outcome 2
Be able to reflect on practice
1.
Reflective Practice/reflecting -
The process of thinking about and critically analyzing your actions with the goal of changing and improving occupational practice. (national occupational standards) ‘Unit SHC 32, Children and young people’s workforce, Miranda Walker.’

Reflecting on how you do things, what you do and what you achieve (known as your processes, practices and outcomes) effectively helps you to see how well you are working in practice. Reflective practitioners regularly: - think about their practice

- analyses their actions
- evaluate their personal effectiveness
- record their reflections, perhaps in a journal
- discuss their reflection with others
- use feedback from others to improve their own evaluations.

This will help them to then do the following:
- identify their strengths
- identify their weaknesses
- notice their achievements
- identify their development needs
- solve problems
- improve practice

Reflection also helps you to see which of your practical strategies and techniques are successful and where a fresh approach would be beneficial. This increases your professional knowledge, understanding and skills. With the benefit of hindsight, you can take time to think through an event or an issue, gaining deeper insight or a cleaner idea of the impact of your actions. You can share your reflection with others using their feedback to further inform your evaluation. In the interests of high quality, it’s advisable for practitioners to measure how well they are doing by the best-practice benchmarks, and not by minimum standards.

When individual practitioners improve their own practice, this impacts on the quality of the service provided by the setting as a whole. In addition, when working as part of a team, practitioners will also be involved in jointly reflecting on and evaluating...
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