Reflection Upon Ebl and Ipl

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Reflection on the experience of EBL and IPL, including discussion of group processes and my own personal contribution.

Within term A of year one I have been introduced to the concepts of Evidence based and Inter-professional learning. These methods of learning are central to the work of a qualified nurse. One of the essential skills of Nursing is self awareness. Burnard 1992:25 tells us that self awareness is “the continuous and evolving process of getting to know who you are”. This practice is promoted by the interaction required when working in groups. I have found this to be one of the key concepts I have taken from the first term.

Tuckman describes the five stages of group processes as forming, storming, norming, performing, and the latterly added adjourning. Having read Tuckman’s theory, I can recognise his theories in the experience I have undergone in EBL in particular. This may have been because IPL commenced after the initial stages of EBL had already occurred, and as such I recognised the same stages as I had already experienced in EBL, meaning that these were not such a learning curve in the latterly formed IPL group.

Tuckman’s first stage of ‘Forming’ refers to the period directly following the creation of the group, in which the individuals are becoming acclimatised to the boundaries within the group, both on a professional and interpersonal basis, forming and testing relationships. This was an interesting stage within our EBL group formation as it almost regressed us back to our school days, the assigned group leader – or facilitator assuming the role of the teacher, the group choosing specific seats, and returning to these same seats for each meeting; politely raising hands in order to make a point to the group. At this stage the individual may be acutely self aware, in a way which limits their participation in the group, or lacking any self awareness in a way which potentially damages the aim of the group, distracts, and delays progress....
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