Reflection Report

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  • Published : May 12, 2012
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In preparation for your next reflection report, I wanted to share some observations and suggestions. In general, your reports were very engaging and articulate and I enjoyed reading them and seeing the spectrum of reactions to the various negotiations. There are a few places which could be improved upon, however. Here the most common: - The biggest is that the lessons that many of you are proposing are just too broad. Examples include statements such as: "to develop a comprehensive negotiation strategy and execute it with discipline" or "to do one’s homework and be better prepared." Some of you precede or follow such statements with concrete examples, but many of you do not. Try and take these prescriptions and give specific examples, either related to the negotiation you’ve just described (i.e. “if I were to negotiate this case again I would …”) or to a potential future negotiation (i.e. “in similar negotiations in the future, I would…”) - Almost all of you are very thoughtful and perceptive in the first part of the report. The negotiations are well described, draw on your preparation work and comment on unexpected approaches by the opponent, but the second –prescriptive- part is often much less developed, in part because you’ve used most of your space describing your experience. Try to spend less time describing (i.e. it is not necessary to list ALL of the offers and counter offers made at the table) and more time on the insights that you’ve gained from your analysis. The goal of this exercise is not to repeat the content of the lecture slides, but to come up with insights that are novel. The best papers were ones where these novel insights were then integrated with relevant course concepts. - Relatedly, several of you are using concepts from class either incorrectly or ambiguously: i.e. "because of this notion of what is fair, I don’t anchor my opening bids high enough." Anchoring occurs when individuals overly rely on a specific piece of information to...
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