Reflection on Nursing Handover

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REFLECTION on Nursing Handover
I have decided to reflect upon the first time I did a nursing handover. In accordance with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (2004) Code of professional conduct, confidentiality shall be maintained and the patient’s name is changed to protect indentity.

Reflective writing is considered a key component of portfolio assessment because it provides evidence of skills development and increasing clinical competence (Smith 2005). What is reflection? Reflection is defined by Wilkinson (1996) as an active process whereby the professional gains an understanding of how historical, social, cultural, cognitive and personal experiences have contributed to professional knowledge and practice. Reflective practice can take place in-action or on-action. Reflection in-action occurs when you are thinking simultaneously as practice occurs. Meanwhile, reflection on-action occurs as retrospective thinking about an experience (Newell 1994). Why is reflective practice so important? Reflective practice is important for everyone - and nurses in particular - for a number of reasons. First, nurses are responsible for providing care to the best of their ability to patients and their families (NMC, 2002; UKCC, 1992). They need to focus on their knowledge, skills and behaviour to ensure that they are able to meet the demands made on them by this commitment. Second, reflective practice is part of the requirement for nurses constantly to update professional skills. Keeping a portfolio offers considerable opportunity for reflection on ongoing development. Annual reviews enable nurses to identify strengths and areas of opportunity for future development (Grant and Greene 2001; Revans 1998). Third, nurses should consider the ways in which they interact and communicate with their colleagues. The profession depends on culture of mutual support. Nurses should aim to become self-aware, self-directing and in touch with their environment (Grant and Greene 2001; Revans 1998). It is therefore a process by which nurses can better understand themselves in order to be able to build on existing strengths and take appropriate future action (Grant and Greene 2001; Revans 1998).

In order to structure my reflection or guide my reflective process I have decided to use the Gibbs Model (1988). I am going to reflect on my thoughts, feelings and beliefs about this incident and what I have learned from this thereafter.

The rationale behind choosing Gibbs (1998) model of reflection is that it is structured in six different stages. This allows a thorough account of the incident to be developed and later reflected on. Gibbs model (1998) goes through six important points to aid the reflective process, including description of incident, feelings, evaluation, analysis, conclusion and finally action plan. Gibbs model was chosen for this incident as it allows anticipated action thereafter once the cycle stops. Gibbs model allows you to think about encountering the same situation again and to plan what you would do differently the next time. By going through the stages of analysis and conclusion, this allows you to learn from the experiences you have made. However, Jasper (2003) explains that although Gibbs provides a useful framework for reflecting in the abstract and usually away from the scene of practice, Gibbs does not provide the means for the cycle to be closed. Whereas, Boud et al. (1985) presented a model which is cyclical in which preparatory elements are linked to the development of skills in noticing and intervening . The disadvantages of Gibbs model may include problems of accuracy in retrospective reflection linked to limitations of memory and the effects of anxiety (Newell 1992).

The six stages of Gibbs model of reflection shall now be discussed in relation to the incident. DESCRIPTION
This reflection is about doing my first handover and this was my third placement but the second placement on a ward, an assessment unit. I had...
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