Recycling Leaflet

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WEEE Regulations: A Vodafone guide to mobile communications equipment recycling Recycle with Vodafone and help protect the environment

There are more mobile phones than people in the UK and increasingly we’ve come to rely on a whole range of mobile equipment. There’s no doubt about how useful we find our communications devices. How can we make sure they go on being useful when we’ve finished with them?

WEEE Regulations: what’s expected of us
The UK Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Regulations place an environmental responsibility and a duty of care on the producers and distributors of electronic equipment. They cover a range of household and business appliances including IT and telecommunications equipment and oblige distributors to make sure there is a scheme in place to take back the equipment at the end of its life for reuse or recycling. For Vodafone, that means anything we sell to you – mobile phones, laptops or netbooks, BlackBerry® devices, chargers and other accessories.

How does our scheme work?
When you come into our store to buy something new we take back the equivalent old mobile equipment that you are replacing on a one-for-one basis. Most of our stores have recycling bins. In smaller stores staff will be able to give you a freepost envelope to send your handset back. If you’re not planning to be in store and you want to recycle an old mobile handset, you can send it to us free of charge at Freepost Vodafone Recycling. The equipment we take back from you is sent on to our specialist recycling partner. Like all electronic goods, mobile equipment contains materials that, while harmless to start with, begin to degrade and pollute the environment if they end up in landfill. So our objective is to give this equipment another lease of useful life.

First of all, our recycling partner assesses the equipment to see if it can be refurbished and reused – perhaps in a developing country where the cost of new equipment is prohibitive...
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