Recruitment Case Study

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 353
  • Published : November 29, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Central Problem

Since the takeover of Mansini’s company by a national conglomerate, emerging challenges of Maple Leaf Shoes Ltd. has presented an urgent need for a Human Resources Manager who possess core skills and extensive experience in human resources to handle the short term as well as long term needs of the company. The increasing global competition, labour and production costs, managerial training and employee development activities faced by the company are issues that needed immediate attention, all of which can be handled only by a full time HR manager whose sole responsibility was to manage the hiring, orientation, training, appraisal and compensation of employees.

As of recent, John McAllister the former HR manager has resigned and Pat Lim, the General Manager of Marketing, is now temporarily undertaking HR responsibilities. Unfortunately, Pat Lim does not possess proper qualifications and necessary experience to address the HR needs of the company. In addition, because Pat Lim’s job as marketing manager requires being away from the office (doing national and international marketing activities) majority of the time, his functions as a temporary HR manager is naturally second priority. This resulted to majority of the urgent issues faced by the company piling up rather than addressed quickly and efficiently.

**Also a problem with regards hiring a new Human Resources Manager is the seemingly resistant attitude of employees toward past HR managers, both of whom did not have very good reputations with Maple Leaf employees. Background

In 1969, Mario Mansini founded Maple Leaf Shoes Ltd., a medium-sized

manufacturer of leather and vinyl shoes located near Wilmington, Ontario.

Mansini adapted a paternalistic style of management and was involved in

most of the decisions made within the company. He put people first and

regarded them as more important than documenting company systems and

putting organizational procedures in place.

The mid-1980 acquisition of the company by a national conglomerate

brought about enormous changes in the organization. Under the leadership

of Robert Clark, the new CEO, the company is more focused on automation

and national and international expansion. Although there were efforts to

improve management practices, it was not one of the company priorities.

Maple Leaf management is currently facing tough challenges on matters of

automation, global competition, bargaining talks with the union and issues

with the Commission on Human Rights regarding the alleged discriminatory

company criteria on job promotion. Added to that is the tight competition

from countries like China, Korea, Indonesia, and Malaysia which poses to be

a threat to Maple Leaf Shoes industry.

Meanwhile, the Leather Workers’ Union which is militantly led by Sam

Polanyi, is all set to stand its guard if no proper negotiations are done to all

the union issues involved.

Pat Lim, the General Marketing Manager, also now acts as the Human

Resource Manager to temporarily fill in the void caused by John

McAllister’s resignation. This current set up does not really address the dire

need of the company for a fully functional human resource manager.

Since the takeover of Maple Leaf Shoes Ltd, a number of issues arose that had Robert Clark realize the significance of a functional Human Resources Department whose Manager is discerning and able to adapt to changing trends in the organization. Maple Leaf Shoes Ltd. needed to hire a Human Resources Manager as soon as possible to address issues within the company.

• There is pressure from Sam Polanyi, President of the Leather Worker’s Union to proceed “slowly” on automation in Maple Leaf’s local plant. • There are pending union negotiations that needed to be concluded in three weeks where major issues on automation and new proposals for workweek are two of the most important bargaining...
tracking img