Recognizing Arguments

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Hi Sherry,
You discovered an interesting example from Obama. You have justified your points, providing supportive reasoning behind your thoughts. You were able to link theory with practical application and real-world settings. However, remember that in an inductive argument, you cannot guarantee the conclusion. A deductive argument follows the if “this” than “that” format, so it must be true. Please see my attached comments regarding 1 premise/conclusion issue, 1 strict/loose, and 3 in part IIa. I would suggest the following to improve the professional nature of your work: Please always include a proper title page. In the top half of the page, centered and double-spaced, include: title of the paper, your first and last name, course number and name, instructor name, and date of submission. Please review the rubric and comments, which have been made directly in your attached paper. Keep working hard. I look forward to your next assignment. Best,

Prof. Trojanowski
M1: Assignment 3
Assignment 3 Grading Criteria | Maximum Points| |
Identified and explained types and component parts of arguments displaying analysis and application of research.| 32| 30| Accurately created diagrams of arguments reflecting comprehension, analysis of information, and critical thinking.| 20| 17| Constructed original arguments demonstrating in-depth understanding of concepts.| 20| 16| Evaluated instances from contemporary media to identify arguments as representative of inductive or deductive reasoning.| 12| 12| Wrote in a clear, concise, and organized manner; demonstrated ethical scholarship in accurate representation and attribution of sources; displayed accurate spelling, grammar, and punctuation.| 16| 15| Total:| 100| 90|

Recognizing Arguments
In this assignment, you will apply key concepts covered in the module readings. You will identify the component parts of arguments and differentiate between various types of arguments such as strict, loose, inductive, and deductive. You will then construct specific, original arguments. There are two parts to the assignment. Complete both parts. Part 1

1a: Identify Components of Arguments
Identify the component parts of the argument, premises and conclusion, for the following passages. Where applicable, highlight key words or phrases that identify a claim as a premise or a conclusion. Refer to the following example:

“All men are mortal. Socrates is a man. Therefore, Socrates is mortal.” All men are mortal.Premise
Socrates is a man.Premise
Therefore, Socrates is mortal.Conclusion
“Therefore” is a key word indicating the claim is the conclusion.

1. Sue is pregnant and will give birth to one child. We know already this child has no genetic anomalies. If Sue’s baby is a boy, he will be named Mark. If Sue’s baby is a girl, she will be named Margaret. Sue will have either a boy or a girl. So we know Sue’s baby will be named Mark or Margaret.

PREMISE: Sue is pregnant and will give birth to one child.
PREMISE: We know already this child has no genetic anomalies. CONCLUSION: If Sue’s baby is a boy, he will be named Mark. CONCLUSION: If Sue’s baby is a girl, she will be named Margaret. PREMISE: Sue will have either a boy or a girl.

CONCLUSION: So we know Sue’s baby will be named Mark or Margaret. “So” is a key word indicating the claim is the conclusion.

2. If the library has The Lord of the Rings, you won’t find it on the first floor. This is because all fantasy novels are fiction and all works of fiction are housed on the second floor of the library. Of course, I am assuming that all the books are properly shelved at this time.

PREMISE: If the library has The Lord of the Rings, you won’t find it on the first floor. PREMISE: This is because all fantasy novels are fiction and all works of fiction are housed on the second floor of the library. CONCLUSION: Of course, I am assuming that all the books are properly shelved at this...
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