Recidivism

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Recidivism

By | June 2010
Page 1 of 7
Abstract

This paper explores the issue of gangs in prison and whether preventing recidivism in light of independent variables is a viable result. Information is presented in both opposition of and to substantiate the claim that the insurgence of street gangs into prison population increases violence. Research including Empirical studies provides a look into this problem and further insight into the likelihood of future successes. Along with the issue of violence, research has provided Criminologists with the knowledge that there must be a culmination of efforts in leading the fight against gang violence.

-this first paragraph shouldn’t be centered

Gangs in Prison: Is Preventing Recidivism a Thing of the Past?
Is there a difference between street gangs and prison gangs? Do the members have similar belief systems? Are those beliefs such that preventing recidivism is even possible? This paper will attempt to shed light on an issue that plagues our country, reflecting not only the horror of gang violence but also its affect on the future of our children. We will explore current legislation and community based programs aimed at eradicating gangs, as well as the legal aspects of gang management. Different sides of the issue will be presented along with empirical studies and research, which examine the effectiveness of current programs. Criminologists vary on their position regarding the best way to minimize the effects of gangs in prison. These will be taken into consideration in determining how street gangs affect prison gangs and how prison gangs affect the future. Before we get there, let us take a look at gangs in general.

What is the definition of a gang? According to the National Criminal Justice Reference Service a gang is a group of three or more individuals who engage in criminal activity and identify themselves with a common name or sign. Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines a gang as “a group of persons working to unlawful or...