Reassessing and Revising Strategic Plans

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Chapter 10

Reassessing and Revising Strategies and Plans


The purpose of this chapter is to review implemented policies, strategies, plans, programs, or projects and to decide on a course of action that will ensure public value continues to be created.

The Strategy Change Cycle is not over once strategies and plans have been implemented. Ongoing strategic management ensure that strategies continue to create public value, and as a prelude to the next round of strategic planning.

Strategies cease to work for four main reasons:

1.A basic strategy may be good but have insufficient resources devoted to its implementation, and therefore insufficient progress is made toward resolving the strategic issue it was meant to resolve.

2.Problems change, prompting a need for new strategies, and making what was once a solution itself a problem.

3.As substantive problem area become crowded with various policies and strategies, their interactions can produce results no one wants and many wish to change.

4.The political environment may shift. As strategies become institutionalized, people’s attention may shift elsewhere. Or leaders and managers may be replaced by people who are uninterested or even hostile to the strategy; they may change elements of it or appoint other people who undermine it.

Desired Outcomes:

Desired outcomes include the maintenance of good strategies, modification of less successful strategies through appropriate reforms, and the elimination of undesirable strategies.

Another desired outcome is the construction and maintenance of a strategic management system to ensure ongoing effective strategic management of the organization.

A final desired outcome is the mobilization of energy and enthusiasm to address the next important strategic issue that comes along.

The assurance that institutionalized capabilities remain responsive to important substantive and symbolic issues.

The resolution of residual issues that occur during sustained implementation. If implemented strategies remain generally responsive to the issues that originally prompted them, inevitably there will be a host of specific difficulties that must be addressed if the strategies are to be highly effective.

The continuous weeding, pruning, and shaping of crowded strategy areas.

To improved organizational knowledge and collaboration across all levels of the organization. Information on progress and achievement should result in better identification of the remaining or new issues, better networks of interaction among key actors, more effective decision making, and generally increased organizational learning.

An increased ability to tell the organization’s story to internal and external audiences, accurately describing what it does, how it does, and what are the results.

Building a Strategic Management System:

Strategic Management Systems are ongoing organizational mechanisms or arrangements for managing the implementation of agreed-upon strategies, assessing the performance of those strategies, and formulating new or revised strategies.

The strategic management process is organized around mission, vision, and values and includes strategic planning.

Many organizations are now building and maintaining an organization-wide Strategic Management System (SMS) as a way of fostering greater rationality, coherence, and cost effectiveness in their strategies and operations.

An SMS describes the organization and its possibilities. It ensures that maximum public value is and continues to be created.
Strategic management requires:

1.Continual monitoring of the organization and its environment. 2.Shaping and communicating to both internal and external audiences. 3.Creating strategic agendas at various levels.
4.Guiding all other management processes in a integrated manner to support and enhance strategic agendas.

The six types of strategic management...
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