Rear Window Sample

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REAR WINDOW
Sample Essay
Successful crime writer's know how to realise their intentions of keeping the responder's mind constantly busy trying to work out ‘who dunnit', often feeling as though they are working side by side with the detective to solve the crime and find the murderer. As well as effective characterisation, character motivation, and settings, crime writers must know the conventions of their chosen sub genre and more importantly how to use and subvert these conventions to achieve their intended purpose. To emphasis the timeless nature of crime fiction we can take a look at two film texts that exemplify how older texts can still entertain modern audiences as much as today's fast-paced modern texts do. Alfred Hitchcock's film "Rear Window" was released over half a century ago in 1954, while Christopher Nolan's movie "The Dark Knight" represents the modern day crime-fiction text, being released just last year. "Rear Window", one of Hitchcock's greatest thrillers, is told almost entirely through his use of imagery rather than dialogue. His expert use of camera angles, shots and voyeuristic framing allows the audience to view the film mainly from the perspective of protagonist, L.B. "Jeff" Jefferies. It is difficult to place "Rear Window" or any Hitchcockian film into a single sub-genre of crime-writing, they may fit the hard-boiled category in some instances, but to give full justice to them, one could say that Hitchcock has created his own sub-genre: the Hitchcock Thriller. Studies and analysis into his films have uncovered many conventions of the Hitchcock Thriller. The most notable include: Framing for emotion: In "Rear Window" one of Hitchcock's main intentions is to ‘show' rather than ‘tell' the audience. He uses plenty of close-up shots to convey emotion on screen. A close-up allows the viewer to see a character's facial expression, such as when Jeff is about to fall from the window near the end of the film; it is pivotal that the audience...
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