Reality Tv

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With everything from Survivor to American Idol, reality TV shows have been capturing the attention of not only the United States, but the rest of the world, as well. Some of them aren’t negative influences, but many are. There may possibly be some educational values in a few. Want to learn how to stab a best friend in the back? Watch Big Brother. How about how to raise a child in high school? Teen Mom and 16 and Pregnant

are there. Reality TV has been around since 1950, but these shows just leaped in popularity in 2002, with the first season of American Idol, as well as Survivor. Shows such as Extreme Makeover and America’s Next Top Model encourage a perfect body image—if these people are real, normal people like the audiences, why shouldn’t they look these stars? Reality TV shows have impacted society negatively because they uphold bad morals, destroy relationships, and exploit their stars.

One reason reality TV shows have negatively impacted society is the way that these TV shows uphold bad morals. For example, on Jersey Shore/ Jerseylicious the stars saw how they get better ratings for cheating on their boyfriend or girlfriend, getting plastic surgery, and getting into fights and arguments with friends or enemies. In order to get better ratings, they’ll cheat, get implants, and get into fights more often. Another example of this is Teen Moms. A study has shown that there are many girls aged 13-18 with low self-esteems, who have thought about getting pregnant in order to get on TV. They thought that it would increase their popularity at school, and give them a chance at their own reality TV show. Though, many of the girls who did end up pregnant didn’t get on TV. The girls just got a kid, and the issues that come with raising a baby at a young age. On The Real Housewives of Orange County, the men and women who get everything are gorgeous, yes, though most of their body is made out of silicone and other plastics. They aren’t exactly the kindest folk, either. The women gossip about each other, and intentionally tell the other women’s boyfriends or husbands about what they had supposedly done. One of the biggest Reality TV icons at the time is Snooki. I’ve talked to girls who think of her as a good role model. But, if you look at Snooki, she’s impure, rude, all about outer beauty, and makes Italian-Americans (especially those living in New Jersey) look self-centered. If you showed Snooki to your parents, would they want you to end up like her? Once the Jersey Shore and Jerseylicious shows become outdated, what do you think the cast’s life is going to be like? Just look at what happened to the former stars of Teen Mom and other reality TV shows. Austin Cline, on About.com says:

“If a production companies creates a show with the explicit intention of trying to make money from the humiliation and suffering which they themselves create for unsuspecting people, then that seems to me to be immoral and unconscionable. I simply cannot think of any excuse for such actions - pointing out that others are willing to watch such events does not relieve them of the responsibility for having orchestrated the events and willed the reactions in the first place. The mere fact that they want others to experience humiliation, embarrassment, and/or suffering (and simply in order to increase earnings) is itself unethical; actually going forward with it is even worse. ” Reality TV shows ruin relationships. It is not just one person saying this, it is actually happening. Teenagers see what someone’s girlfriend or boyfriend is like, and raise their standards on how they want him or her to be good looking, wealthy, and completely submissive. they expect something more out of the other person. When this “more” might make the other person in the relationship completely lose confidence in themselves, and become more self-conscious. They see what their boyfriend or girlfriend wants out of them, and strive for that. Maybe their partner never said...
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