Realism in Fiction Writing

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Baym, Nina The Norton Anthology American Literature (2008) Seventh Edition, New York, W. W. Norton & Company I think during the 19th century realism artists wrote all the fiction novels. As the world evolved and people faced difficult situations, naturalist artists also evolved and faced the same problems.

realism artists wrote fiction and as in the 19th century had no st then there was a lot of false ideals then

REALISM: refers generally to any artistic or literary portrayal of life in a faithful, accurate manner, unclouded by false ideals, literary conventions, or misplaced aesthetic glorification and beautification of the world. It is a theory or tendency in writing to depict events in human life in a matter-of-fact, straightforward manner. It is an attempt to reflect life "as it actually is"--a concept in some ways similar to what the Greeks would call mimesis. Typically, "realism" involves careful description of everyday life, "warts and all," often the lives of middle and lower class characters in the case of socialist realism. In general, realism seeks to avoid supernatural, transcendental, or surreal events. It tends to focus as much on the everyday, the mundane, and the normal as events that are extraordinary, exceptional, or extreme. “Realism as a movement in novel-writing developed in early nineteenth-ecentury Europe and the United States. Writers as seemingly different as William Dean Howells and Mark Twain offered objective, detached views of everyday life appropriate for middle-class readers. By the nineteenth century, realism was simply considered modern, and readers assumed that contemporary fiction would aspire to offer verisimilitude.” (Norton Anthology, 2008. Pg. 1745). Baym, Nina The Norton Anthology American Literature (2008) Seventh Edition, New York, W. W. Norton & Company

Literary Terms and Definitions. Realism. Retrieved May 10, 2013. From http://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms_R.html
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