Realism in Dracula

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Over the course of the novel Dracula, author Bram Stoker’s purpose in creating a strong sense of realism becomes progressively apparent. He does so by marrying realism and the novel’s clear fiction to create terror, and shock all those that open its pages. Through this, he’s reaching the reader in a thoughtful manner, as they might perceive events of story to be real indeed. The use of intricate language enables Stoker to appear to sincerely know what transpires during the course of the novel with the help of vivid detail. The reader feels as if they’re watching the scene unfold as the characters do themselves. The struggle between Good and Evil is plainly seen as the sole debacle in the novel. Dr. Seward among side Professor Van Helsing, Quincey Morris, Lord Godalming and Mr. and Mrs. Harker, team up to fight off the terrible creature that is Count Dracula. Though no easy feat their desire to triumph over such a terrible being who terrorizes all those who he infects leads to the hunting of Dracula.

“[W]e must either capture or kill this monster in his lair; or we must, so to speak, sterilize the earth, so that no more he can seek safety in it” (261).

The ridding of a horrible individual is uncannily realistic in that we all desire to rid ourselves of those who create and bring misery upon us. There’s no need in life to continue ties with those who receive joy out of the sheer despair of other much like Count Dracula. Additionally, realism is observed through undertones of symbolism in a sexual, sophisticated manner. Much like Dracula’s vampire acts, Lucy’s blood transfusions are seen as rather sexual. Although engaged to a loving Arthur, the blood of several males that’s transfused into Lucy illustrates her pleasure in infidelity. Dr Seward states,

“No man knows till he experiences it, what it is to feel his own life-blood drawn away into the veins of the woman he loves” (156).

Although an underlying tone in the novel, it expresses the reality of...
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