Reading Summary of Privacy

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Monica. Liu
March 1, 2013
Reading Summary:
“Privacy” by Deborah G. Johnson
This article is written by Deborah G. Johnson, on page 204-214, the author mainly talks about the following points: First, in the first part, the author thinks that once people begin to have interest in using the information of individual, privacy will exist. It points out that those who want information about individuals want it because they believe that it will help them to make better decisions and serve their customers better. Such views heavily distort in gathering and exchange of information, so people should make a more powerful case for protecting and ensuring privacy in the lives of individuals so that people will not feel uncomfortable about the amount of information that is gathered about them. Secondly, the author states privacy as an individual good in Personal Privacy part, which distinct privacy as an instrumental good and privacy as an intrinsic good. In Reframing the Computers and Privacy Issue-Privacy as a Social Good part, it states privacy as a social good. In this part, it mentions two terms of autonomy and democracy. Once people lose the control of information about themselves, their autonomy will be reduced. And democracy is a kind of idea that citizens have the freedom to exercise autonomy. When privacy is as a social good, it is more important than efficiency and better consumer services. Thirdly, this article presents the importance of individual controlling and relationship establishing. The author considers individual controlling will effect on establishing a relationship with that individual and determining the character of the relationship, at the same time, it will influence the diversity of relationship. Once people lose control of information, it will reduce their ability to establish and influence the relationships they have and the character of those relationships. Finally, it points out several possible counterarguments: privacy only...
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