Read Recite Review

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Read-Recite-Review... Remember|
A critical analysis; 3R Study strategy|
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Nicole Turnbull|
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Transition to University Study – SSS021
Roy Sanders
13 March 2013
Transition to University Study – SSS021
Roy Sanders
13 March 2013

Mark A. McDonald, Daniel C. Howard and Gillies O. Einstein (2009). The Read-Recite-Review Study: Effective and Portable. A Journal of the Association for Psychological Science, Vol 20 No 4, 516 – 522.

There are numerous strategies used by students for learning and recalling information from various sources of educational texts. The paper (Mark A. McDonald, 2009) provides evidence why the study strategy; 3R Read-Recite-Review produces mnemonic benefits that exceed those of note-taking and rereading. Two experiments were conducted, students were instructed to learn specific pieces of text using either; reread only (control group), read and take notes (control group) or follow the process of the read-recite-review strategy. The effectiveness and efficiency of the study strategies were assessed by timing the time taken to complete the reading process and by comparing the results of immediate and delayed testing which utilised free call, multiple choice and short answers to check the amount of information retained. Experiment 1 required students to read factual, simple and short passages which proved that the 3R strategy was more effective using free call of information both immediately and delayed, however these benefits did not show in the results for both multiple choice and short answer tests. Experiment 2 involved students reading longer and more complex passages, results supported those found in experiment 1. Additionally the second experiment found 3R beneficial over rereading for both multiple choice and problem solving. The results from both experiments concluded that the 3R strategy may promote a deep learning of materials, having benefits beyond improving retention. The study clearly...
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